Our Online Applications are Powered by Wagtopia
See details

Available - Annie

Female Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Annie was a hunting dog and gets along with most dogs and people. She hasn’t been around children in her foster... show more
Socialization/training:  Annie was a hunting dog and gets along with most dogs and people. She hasn’t been around children in her foster home. Annie’s previous owners surrendered her and her sister to this rescue. Annie is housebroken but is used to being able to go outside anytime she wants thru a doggie door except for when she is crated at night, which then she will bark if needs to go potty. Annie gets along with most dogs since she pretty much ignores them, as she has her sister to play and hang out with. Cats are definitely a No because she thinks that they are there to chase after. Crate trained: Yes Leash trained: Yes Activity Level:  Annie is fairly active, she likes to run in the yard with her sister, point bugs/butterflies, birds and squirrels. She also likes to hunt moles in the yard! But she has come to like being inside the air conditioned house when she is done with her duties patrolling the yard. Fence:  Fence preferred, or she will need lots of long walks. Behavior:  Annie loves everyone who will give her attention! She has not been exposed to young children, though I don't believe that it would be a problem. Annie is a social bug and loves lots of attention except for when she is busy barking at our cat and watching the birds/squirrels. She is a very slow eater or won't eat all her food. So some canned food would be a benefit for her. Medical History:  Annie is spayed and recently had a dental, UTD on vaccinations, microchipped, on HWP and wears a Seresto collar for flea/tick preventative. She had a full blood workup in May. Annie does have a low thyroid so she needs a thyroid tab twice a day but you can get a 3 month supply from Chewy for $6.00 plus delivery fee. There will be a bottle going home with her. Foster Comments: Annie is a very sweet loving pup who deserves a good family to play with or just hang out watching TV. If you are interested in adopting 2 dogs then she would love to have her sister Jip join her! Annie is a very healthy dog. Annie used to be just an outside dog who lived on a farm running wild until cooped up in a barn horse stall at night. She had been bred several times and was used for bird hunting. Annie loves her life now inside in air conditioning, getting lots of attention or outside thru doggie door for exercise. Annie is very birdy!! We love both Annie and her sister so if you are looking for companionship then she is your girl!! Foster Location: Corydon, IN Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Carly

Female Young English Pointer
Socialization/training: Carly spent her life before rescue in a pen in a backyard; she arrived at foster home very anxious and scared. I... show more
Socialization/training: Carly spent her life before rescue in a pen in a backyard; she arrived at foster home very anxious and scared. In the 2.5 months in foster, she has made lots of progress and has come out of her shell. She is a sweet dog who has become happy to play with the other dogs in the foster home and she loves food and treats. She has lost 4 lbs and looks sleek and athletic! She gets along well with both the other dogs and the cat in her foster home.  Crate trained: Yes Leash trained: Yes Activity Level: Fence:  Fence would be nice but not required. Invisible fence would also be ok if she was trained for it.   Behavior: She likes attention and continues to improve on trusting her foster mom. When she first arrived, it was evident she hadn’t gotten attention unless it was negative. Medical History:   Spayed, microchipped, UTD on vaccinations, on monthly heartworm prevention. She is a healthy girl.    Foster Comments: Carly would do best in a home with another dog because another dog (or dogs) gives her confidence and playmates; as an only dog she’d be ok too. Foster home has multiple dogs and foster mom feels she’ll continue to thrive with attention and positive reinforcement.  Foster Location:  Durham, NC Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Dahlia

Female Young English Setter Pointer (mixed)
Socialization/training: Dahlia loves people! When I have visitors, she is very persistent in wanting their attention. Eventually she wil... show more
Socialization/training: Dahlia loves people! When I have visitors, she is very persistent in wanting their attention. Eventually she will revert to her favorite indoor activity, looking out the front door for rabbits, squirrels, or walkers. Dahlia will come when called indoors, but outdoors it depends on whether she is ready to come in. She is focused on hunting chipmunks and will not be distracted from that. She is a good hunter. She was recently cat tested and with one she interacted really nicely with nose to nose tail wagging, the 2nd cat swatted at her so she moved away quickly and never showed any interest in her after that. Crate trained: Yes. I kept her in a crate overnight the first two weeks but now she sleeps on the couch with my 20 lb terrier mix. I still crate her when I am not home although I’m leaving her out for short periods of time. She is not destructive, but she is still a puppy and loves to steal shoes or socks or my other dog’s toys. She doesn’t chew them up, she just likes to take them. Leash trained: Dahlia is leash trained.  I have been using the gentle leader, and she does quite well.  She has been running with the neighbor, and does very well. Activity Level:  Dahlia is very playful with other dogs and does well in a dog park setting too. She and my grandson’s pit bull ran around after each other in the back yard until they were exhausted. In the house she and my terrier do play with toys and also chase each other. She would do best in a house with a like-sized dog to play with. A bonus would be if the owner was a runner. She would be a good running companion. She does take naps during the day and is pretty quiet in the evenings. Fence: Dahlia definitely needs a 6’ fence. She has climbed over a 4' fence, so she will definitely need a taller fence than that. Behavior: Dahlia is a cuddler. She likes to have people around her. She is attentive when in the house. Medical History: Dahlia is a very healthy, happy dog. She has Ehrlichia as a result of not being on flea and tick medication in her previous life. She is being treated for it with antibiotics. She is spayed, microchipped, up to date on vaccinations and on monthly heartworm prevention.    Foster Comments:  Dahlia is a very sweet girl. She is still in the puppy stage so should not yet be left alone in the house, but that will pass. She likes squeaky toys and chews. She will be a great addition to an active family. Foster Location: Kansas City, KS Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Daisy

Female Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Daisy is a sweet and energetic girl. She loves to snuggle, and greets everyone we meet when out on walks. She w... show more
Socialization/training:  Daisy is a sweet and energetic girl. She loves to snuggle, and greets everyone we meet when out on walks. She was trained to be a hunting dog, but her former owner reports that “she had no interest in the quail.” It’s obvious, however, that she has some training. I stumbled upon some of her commands by accident. For example, she will sit when you say “down” and accompany this command with a down-facing palm. She also will stop barking if you shush her. Not a hunting dog command, but it works! Daisy is not a big time barker, but she does get excited when she sees birds and butterflies in the yard. In fact, she particularly likes to “hunt” butterflies and shadows. She will stay fixed and pointed on a shadow for quite some time. This may have contributed to her quail hunt failures… Daisy’s former owner reports that she spent time out in the fields with other dogs and had no issues. She and my senior Setter, Higgins, spend time together in the yard. When Daisy first arrived, she was not very interested in playing with Higgins. But in recent weeks, the fun side of her personality has emerged. She will now initiate play with Higgins. She seems to somehow know that he’s an old man and can’t really do the rough and tumble. So they mostly go in circles around each other, nuzzling. Daisy is often content chasing the shadows and butterflies, and now more often, the birds that visit the feeders in the yard. She is usually sweet to Higgins, giving him kisses. She has staked out her “spot” in the house, however, and will defend it if Higgins gets too close. We do not have cats in the house, but often encounter the street cats while on walks. Most of the time, Daisy walks right by them with little notice. Sometimes she will stop and sniff in their direction. She is more interested in the wild turkeys that walk about and will point at them. Daisy would really benefit from more interaction with other dogs so she can learn how to play. Crate trained:  Unknown. We do not have a crate, however, Daisy lived a good chunk of her two years in a kennel. Daisy sleeps on her rumpled up comforter on the floor. I’ve tried folding it so she can have a fluffy and tidy bed, but she prefers it all pell mell. Leash trained:  In progress. When Daisy first arrived in April, I’m not sure she understood what walks were for. Like a good hunting dog, she followed her nose in a ziggy wag fashion, sometimes wrapping the leash around my ankles. She didn’t seem to get the concept of “heel,” and still doesn’t. However, she is observant and has watched Higgins on walks and when he gets rewarded. She has since slowed down and doesn’t pull as much, AND she generally now walks in a straight line! I consider that progress. I use a martingale harness with her, and she does best when I use the front leash hook. She also has a bit of a sensitive gag reflex, so hooking to her collar is not the best. House Trained:  I was expecting to have to work with Daisy on this since she, as far as we know, has never lived in a home. However, she has only had one accident in the house. We were gone a good part of the day, so, oops. She always lets me know when she needs to go out, either by staring at me, or by standing at the door and barking. Activity Level:  Daisy can be pretty high energy. She definitely needs more activity than my household provides. As mentioned above, she can entertain herself for quite some time running the yard, chasing shadows and butterflies. She really needs a job to do, something that will require focus and discipline. Daisy has considerable nervous energy, which sometimes gets expressed through digging holes. In the house, she will sometimes pace, lie down, pace some more. . . She needs more to do and buddies to do it with! Daisy would benefit from a home where her owner can spend time working with her, training her, running her, socializing her with other dogs, etc. Fence:  Daisy will sometimes try to escape when I open the gate. I have a 5-foot welded wire fence, and that contains her well. She has not tried to climb the fence, nor to dig under it. I’m not sure how she would do without a fence. As it is, she does not always come in the house when called, especially if she is distracted by a shadow or some other “critter.” If I go out to retrieve her with the leash, she does not resist, but is still learning to come when called. It’s not necessary that her forever home have a fenced yard, as long as Daisy can get a couple walks/day, some zoomie run time at a dog park and some focused training in the areas mentioned above. Now that Daisy has figured out how much fun walks can be, she definitely wants them a couple times/day. Daisy can sometimes be a bit of a nervous Nellie, so I don’t think an invisible fence is the best option for her. She is fearful of noises like garbage trucks, motorcycles and thunder. Even when in the house, she will run and hide in a corner when she hears them. Behavior:  Daisy definitely loves to cuddle. She also may follow you from room to room. She prefers to be near her person. She always gets excited to see you, even if you’ve only just been behind a closed door for a few minutes. She does the setter roo when she is particularly excited. Daisy is not highly food-motivated and does not exhibit any food guarding. But she is happy to finish whatever Higgins leaves behind. Medical History:  Daisy is UTD on vaccinations, is heart-worm negative and on monthly prevention, microchipped, recently spayed and pretty much recovered from that. When Daisy arrived, she had an eye infection. It seemed to have been caused by a clogged tear duct, but has since been diagnosed as a benign cyst. On June 16, 2022, Daisy had the cyst surgically removed. She is recovering well and will have the sutures removed on July 5, 2022. Daisy is a strong and healthy girl. She was ready to run around the yard the day after her surgery, much against the advice of her doctor. It’s been challenging keeping her down so she can rest and recover. Foster Comments:  Daisy is a smart girl and very observant. Not only has she learned about leash walking from Higgins, but she has also figured out that I will not open the door until she is seated and quiet. I never had to teach her this. She just watched Higgins do it and copied him. She definitely has a few training gaps (like learning to heel, walk off leash, come when called), but overall, she’s a fine upstanding citizen. Foster Location:  Orlando, FL Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Jett

Female Adult English Setter Irish Setter (mixed)
Socialization/training:  Jett is a happy girl. She enjoys hanging outside on a deck while her people relax. She chases squirrels and dig... show more
Socialization/training:  Jett is a happy girl. She enjoys hanging outside on a deck while her people relax. She chases squirrels and digs when she smells something interesting. Jett does not like car rides.  Crate trained: Yes. Leash trained: She likes walks and would enjoy evenings out for dinner downtown with her people. When Jett walks in the park or woods, she wants to sniff and meet all the creatures, so she needs a strong and sturdy walker. Activity Level: Jett is laid back.  Fence:  She needs at least a 4’ sturdy chained link fence. She also enjoys leash walking.  Behavior: Jett is a cuddler and she is attentive. She likes a couch when watching tv and wants to be in the living space with her family. Medical History: Jett is spayed, microchipped, up to date on vaccinations, and on monthly heartworm prevention. She is a healthy girl.          Foster Comments:  Jett is an easy foster.  She just wants to be with her family. Jett prefers a quiet home; one where she doesn’t have to share her toys with small children. Foster Location:  Fredericksburg, Virginia Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Jip

Female Adult English Setter
Socialization/training:  Jip was a hunting dog and gets along with most dogs and people. She hasn’t been around children in her foster h... show more
Socialization/training:  Jip was a hunting dog and gets along with most dogs and people. She hasn’t been around children in her foster home. Jip is housebroken but is used to being able to go outside anytime she wants thru a doggie door except for when she is crated at night. If she needs to go at night, she will bark. Jip gets along with most dogs; she pretty much ignores them since she has her sister to play and hang out with. Cats are definitely a no because she thinks that they are there to chase after. Crate trained: Yes, Jip is crate trained. Leash trained: Yes, she is leash trained too but definitely needs a fenced in yard or lots of long walks. Activity Level:  Jip is fairly active, she likes to run in the yard with her sister, point bugs/butterflies, birds and squirrels. But she has come to like being inside the air conditioned house when she is done with her duties patrolling the yard. Fence: Fence preferred, or she will need lots of long walks. Behavior:  Jip loves everyone who will give her attention! She has not been exposed to young children, though I don't believe that it would be a problem. Jip is a social bug and loves lots of attention except for when she is busy barking at our cat and watching the birds/squirrels.  Medical History:  She is spayed, microchipped, UTD on vaccinations, on HWP, full blood work in May, and dental when spayed. Seresto collar for flea/tick protection. In good health. Foster Comments: Jip is a very sweet loving pup who deserves a good family to play with or just hang out watching TV. If you are interested in adopting 2 dogs then she would love to have her sister Annie join her! Jip is a very healthy dog who currently eats Taste of Wild Venison Buffalo dry dog food with some canned ID mixed in with it otherwise she won't eat enough to keep her weight up. So canned food would be a benefit for her.  Jip used to be just an outside dog who lived on a farm running wild until cooped up in a barn horse stall at night. She had been bred several times and was used for bird hunting. Jip loves her life now inside in air conditioning getting lots of attention or outside thru doggie door for exercise. We love both Jip and her sister so if you are looking for companionship then she is your girl!! Foster Location: Corydon, IN Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Louiza

Female Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Louiza came from the streets of Greece and is still learning to adjust to a more comfortable life. When she arr... show more
Socialization/training:  Louiza came from the streets of Greece and is still learning to adjust to a more comfortable life. When she arrived, she was always on guard and very skittish, particularly with men. She has learned to trust people and now prefers their company vs. just being with other dogs. With those she trusts, she LOVES affection and attention. She remains easily startled and sometimes still flinches, especially if approached suddenly, but has learned to quickly accept petting and affection. It will likely take her some time to adjust to new surroundings and to build trust with her new family, but once she gets comfortable, she will become a constant companion. Louiza will get very attached to her family, but it will probably take a while for her to adjust to strangers or be comfortable with new people. With those she trusts, she is very affectionate and loves to cuddle. Her biggest trait is her curiosity. She is always watching what is going on and investigating new things. She typically follows us around outside and explores her surroundings so long as her people are within eye sight. She wants to know what is going on around every corner and what is behind every door.  Crate trained: Yes. Louiza is crate trained but prefers not to use it if she does not have to. She will dance in circles and go in her crate for food but will bark to be released if she can see her people once the food is complete. We have found that Louiza does best outside the crate, so we let her sleep on the family room sofa at night and she is very good there. We do crate her when we are away from home, but that is generally for no more than 2-3 hours, and she is fine while we are out, but wants to be let out as soon as we get home. Louiza would much prefer to sleep with her people, and we would prefer a home where she does not have to be crated often or for long periods of time. Good with dogs/cats/kids: There are no cats or children in Louiza’s foster home. She can be very skittish and would likely not do well with very small or loud and erratic children. She would be better suited for a family without kids or with older, more mature children. Louiza needs a quieter home where she can feel safe and get comfortable. While we cannot say for sure how she is with cats since we do not have any, she exhibits very little prey drive compared to the other Setters in her pack. We suspect she would be curious of cats but could learn to live with them (and even like them) once she gets comfortable. Louiza has been living with a large pack of 11 other dogs. She has demonstrated no aggression or dominance behavior at all.  She is very comfortable with other dogs and looks to the others to set the example for her. She follows their lead and they have helped her to come out of her shell and become more comfortable around people. We think that having another confident and friendly dog in her forever home would be very helpful and important for Louiza to adjust to her new home and family. Leash trained: Louiza is still very fearful, and she has not learned to walk on a leash. She will typically freeze and not move. When she first arrived, she needed to be carried in and out of the house, and it will take time and patience for her to learn to walk on a leash. House trained: Louiza is generally housebroken and does well in the house, but it is important to stay outside in the yard with her before bedtime or leaving the house to make sure she does her “business” so she doesn’t have an accident. She often wants to stay close to you, so she won’t stay out long enough to potty unless you are with her – particularly at night. Activity Level: Louiza is a medium energy dog. She can be active with her exploring in the yard but rarely wants to stay out for long and will not do so without her people for long periods, but she is getting more confident and staying out longer. She will often hang out near the back door and wait for an opportunity to come back inside. She was hesitant to go through doors initially but her desire for a soft dog bed or couch has helped her get more comfortable with coming back inside. She is a bit of a furniture ‘parkour’ in the house and is always climbing up on anything she can and trying to squeeze through spaces she might fit. Fence: Fence is REQUIRED. Louiza does not walk comfortably on a leash so a safely fenced yard is critical for her. She is very tiny and can squeeze through small spaces (she squeezes herself through our pool fence regularly), but she wants to be with her family, so she does not try to escape. When she does squeeze through the pool fence, if she cannot figure out how to get back out, she barks for us to come get her. Behavior: Louiza has come a long way in a short time. When she initially arrived, she was very fearful and skittish and was afraid to let people close. Being with other dogs who are comfortable with people has helped her gain trust in humankind, and now she is our little shadow. She actively pursues affection and snuggles. She still flinches if she does not see the hand coming when you try to pet her, however, she quickly relaxes and leans in once she recognizes the intent. She is a little pocket Setter with oversized curiosity and a desire for affection. We expect she may regress a bit initially and be more skittish with a new family until she learns her new people and environment. After a little time with patient love she will get comfortable and return to being a companion Setter who likes snuggles, mealtime, and affection. Medical History:  Louiza is spayed, microchipped, healthy, and up to date on all her shots. When she was found, we discovered that she had an angular deformity in her left front leg which caused her foot to stick outward at an angle. We do not know if this defomity was congenital or if it had been caused by an injury at some point, but it was impacting her mobility and seemed to cause her some pain. We worked with an orthopedic surgeon in Greece who used some new technology to make 3D models of her leg bones to help them perform a corrective osteotomy surgery. The surgery was very successful, and Louiza has healed well. If you look at her leg, her foot is still not perfectly straight and she has a large lump at the wrist joint, but this is normal calcification, and she is no longer in pain or impaired. Her vet here in the USA took x-rays and was very pleased with the outcome of her surgery and said she has healed very well. Her next leishmaniasis test is due in January 2023. She is on monthly heartworm prevention. Louiza originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Louiza was originally found in Andrianos in Koropi – in a mountain suburb about 30 minutes outside of Athens. When she was found, she was very weak, extremely skinny (only 22 pounds) and very afraid. She had an obvious issue with her left front leg which they initially thought was a fracture that had healed improperly. We don’t know much about Louiza’s history, but we suspect that she was treated harshly given her initial fear of people. When Louiza first came to our house, she was immediately comfortable with the other dogs, but was skittish with people, particularly men. She got comfortable with her foster mom first, and with a bit of time, became very attached to her foster dad as well. Now Louiza readily comes when called and looks for every opportunity to be near us. In fact, she has now decided that she really doesn’t want to be apart from us and is always looking to be close to her family.  Whenever she is outside in the yard, she comes immediately when we call her and she answers to both “Louiza” and her nickname “Weezy”. Despite the surgery she had on her leg, Louiza is quite agile and has no problem climbing up on things. She likes to climb on top of one of the spare crates in the sunroom to look out at the yard. She also climbs on the back of the sofa to check out what is going on in the kitchen. Louiza is a loving girl, but she is still adjusting to life in a home with a family, and she startles easily. It takes her time to trust new people and situations, and she will need a patient, gentle and loving family to make her feel safe and continue building her trust in people. Louiza needs a quieter home where she can feel safe, and a home with another friendly dog (or more) will be highly preferred. Once you earn Louiza’s trust, she will be a huge lover and an affectionate and loyal companion. Foster Location: Temperance, MI Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Ramses

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Ramses is as affectionate as he is handsome! His absolute favorite thing in the world is to be next to you. If... show more
Socialization/training:  Ramses is as affectionate as he is handsome! His absolute favorite thing in the world is to be next to you. If you’re standing, he loves to lean on you. If you’re sitting, his favorite place is curled up next to you. He’s very attached to people – we call him a velcro dog. If you move around the house, chances are he’ll follow. He’s not too picky about who he’s hanging out with. It seems that he pretty much loves everyone. If you’re looking for an affectionate, sweet dog- Ramses is your guy. Crate trained: He’s done well with crate training. He barks for a couple of minutes at first, but he settles down quickly. He also does well on a dog bed in our bedroom without a crate, but he does have a tendency to get up and wander if the door is open. Crate training would be helpful at the beginning, but probably won’t be necessary for long. He does like to chew, so having lots of options for him is important.   Leash trained: Ramses is very good on a leash- particularly with the assistance of a gentle leader or similar aid. He’s a typical Setter, so he’s always on the lookout for birds, squirrels, etc. and sometimes zig-zags more than walks in a straight line, but he doesn’t pull hard and seems to really enjoy walks around the neighborhood. We haven’t taken him on any long hikes, but I think that’s something he would enjoy very much!   Activity Level: Ramses is a very typical Setter when it comes to activity. He loves to run around our fenced backyard looking for and chasing birds and squirrels. He plays with his foster brothers whenever they’re willing. Overall he loves to be outside and burns plenty of energy when he is. When he comes in the house he calms down quickly and mostly in search of someone sitting that he can lay his head on their lap. Once he does, he won’t move until they do. If everyone’s busy, he’ll usually find a quiet space to lie down- sometimes in his crate or bed, but never far from his people. Fence:  A fence is recommended, but it needs to be at least 6 feet tall if he’s going to be unsupervised. He’s found one spot in our 6’ fence where the topography brings it down to about 5’ that he can jump over. He’s a very athletic boy and anything less than 6’ won’t pose much of a challenge for him to get over. He’s not overly motivated to leave the yard and would never challenge the fence if you’re outside with him, but if he’s alone and has the chance he’ll try to go find his people. At the moment he gets his exercise through walks and supervised time in the backyard. Behavior:  Affectionate is the word that best describes Ramses. He loves being in close contact with people and getting pets. He would love to sit in your lap, but he’s content with sitting next to you with his head on your lap or leaning on your legs. He doesn’t get anxious when not around people, but he seeks out their company whenever he can. He’s very sweet and gentle, especially when he’s in the house with his family. He loves rides in the car and doesn’t seem to have any problems with motion sickness- even rides to the vet are a welcomed adventure for Ramses! Medical History:  Up to date on all vaccinations, spayed, microchipped, on HWP, and our vet had no concerns. His next leishmaniasis test is due May, 2023. Ramses originates from Greece/Turkey where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments:  Ramses would be a great fit for many family situations. He gets along great with his foster brothers as well as our teenage boys. He loves to be outside- going for walks, playing in the yard chasing birds, balls and squirrels or with his foster brothers. Then when it’s time to come in he calms down and he’s quiet and easy going. He has a few things he needs to work on, but he learns quickly and I think will adapt to anyone’s expectation. Like with most Setters, a gentle hand is the best approach. Although I think Ramses could adapt to just about any family, he would do best where he has plenty of attention. He really craves human interaction and too much time alone could lead to behavior issues. I don’t think he would mind a busy household or an active family as long as he’s included in the daily activities and gets the attention he deserves. Any family will be lucky to have Ramses. He’s a sweet, funny, handsome young boy with lots of hugs to give! Foster Location:  Greer, South Carolina Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Roxie/Nana

Female Young English Setter
Socialization/training: Somewhat shy, Roxie takes a little time with people and new situations.  She is a very loyal girl and once settl... show more
Socialization/training: Somewhat shy, Roxie takes a little time with people and new situations.  She is a very loyal girl and once settled in will bond closely with you.  Because of her hearing needs, she would do best in a calmer home with an adult household and /or older dog savvy children. It was confirmed just a few weeks ago that Roxie is indeed deaf.  Now learning hand signals, she is very excited about communicating with her people!   When asked where is your ball—she ran to get it!  A big victory for all of us. She would thrive in a home that would be committed to work with her on signing. She is an eager learner—and would enjoy just about any activity.  Her comfort zones are the home, car rides, hanging out in the yard, playing fetch and tug. Socialization with other dogs is very good & includes tug & running around the yard together. She would definitely benefit from having another dog as a companion in her new home.   Overall, she is a fun, active dog, that is also content with hanging out with her people for a good cuddle.  It may take some time to get establsished in a new home, but that is true of most rescues. She will need a family that is patient and loving with her.    Crate trained: Yes, Roxy considers a create a safe place. We initially used the crate, but now Roxie has free run of the house. Leash trained: Needs work but is getting better. She will try to pull when she sees squirrels, cats and birds. We use a harness and loop the leash around her middle. She loves a good walk. and is getting better at it every day.  She loves meeting small dogs and is getting more comfortable with new people and situations. Activity Level: Medium, very puppy like. She loves to run & stalk birds & squirrels in the yard, & play fetch. Once her energy is spent, she enjoys a good nap, and a snuggle. She engages in play with other dogs and anyone willing to throw a ball. She enjoys a nice car ride and will settle down and lay contently underfoot, ready to go when you are. Fence: Fenced yard is required.  Roxie is unable to ”hear” if something is coming up to her. This can be startling and scary. She deserves a place that she can depend on keeping her safe and enable her to have the freedom to play ball, roam around stalking birds and bugs. Behavior: She generally follows me from room to room, likes to have her people within eye sight. She does explore the yard on her own and with the resident dogs, watching and learning from them. She is more of a follower than a leader and hesitant in new places, looking to her people for direction.  Roxie does exhibit some reactive & startle behaviors toward fast movements.  She has a very loud bark, as an alert and part startle reflex, but once she realizes that everything is ok, she settles down quickly.   The first year of Roxie’s life was spent having people treating her as a hearing dog.  In her world, she was getting mixed signals—or to her, none at all because they were – verbal! How frustrating & confusing this was for her. It seems apparent that someone in her past was not so kind with her. She has developed some habits that need to be redirected---her loud barking & growl when some enters or leaves the room—is one behavior we have lessened, but not completely stopped. She is now less afraid when something different happens. We now see her fear changing to curiosity and wonder as she tries to figure things out—ice cubes in the water dish---hmmm, what’s that!  Roxie is a work in progress.  In her next home, she will need an experienced dog owner that is loving, patient, and consistent in training with signing.  As she achieves communication with her people, she has begun to feel more comfortable and confident.  She is a great dog—she needs a good partner to help her on this journey.  Medical History: Spayed, up to date on shots. Microchipped and on monthly Heartworm, & flea & tick preventatives.   She is a healthy dog! She may be hearing impaired, but doesn't let that slow her down. She is smart & eager to learn. Foster Comments:  Roxy is a sweet, active young dog with typical setter energy. She plays hard, is a sound sleeper and master cuddler.  She likes to please and is food motivated. A natural hunter, she will spend time outdoors sniffing out critters and stalk the birds in the yard.   She feels very comfortable outside and will need time to settle into new surroundings.  It would be helpful for there to be another dog around to show her the ropes and keep her company. She is just beginning to learn how to communicate by signing—and is looking for a home that will spend time with her on this. We have just started and she is eager to learn more.    Foster Location: Port Crane, New York Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Shaggy

Female Adult English Setter Labrador Retriever (mixed)
Socialization/training:  Shaggy is enrolled in day camp and training sessions to help her socialization and training. She is showing som... show more
Socialization/training:  Shaggy is enrolled in day camp and training sessions to help her socialization and training. She is showing some improvement in socializing with people and is learning to bond. Shaggy does not socialize well with other dogs. The trainer works with Shaggy one on one with basic commands and on focusing. Shaggy would rather play fetch and is more interested in balls and Kongs than in people. Shaggy is learning sit, wait, no, come, twirl, and paw. She understands “sit and wait”. I use this before she exits the crate and when she is ready to eat. When she is getting ready to go outside she knows “Sit, Wait, then Go.” Shaggy is showing improvement with various commands as time goes by. Crate trained:  No. Shaggy has a major issue with the crate. She panics & does not do well left alone in the crate. However, she will go in her crate for bed and stay the night if she can see that someone is in the room. I believe Shaggy will eventually be fine in a bedroom on the floor. House trained: Shaggy is not completely housebroken yet and needs to go out every 60-90 mins. She will have accidents if not taken out regularly. I believe she will house train once comfortable in the right setting. I do think Shaggy will learn well in an environment more suited to her needs. Leash trained: Not yet, leash training is still a work in progress. She is quite strong and tends to pull. Activity Level: Shaggy is an active dog and has energy. She inspects the house and yard every day. She will self-play or will play fetch. Her favorite things are tennis balls—or almost any ball—and the red Kong to throw around or to have the frozen peanut butter inside. Like many setters, she is rough on plush toys. Fence: I suggest a physical fence at least 5’ high. She has not challenged my 5’ fence, but I don’t leave her in my yard unattended. An invisible fence will also be considered if the adopters have setter experience. Behavior: Shaggy is not much of a cuddler, but will settle down near you if you are sitting for awhile or watching TV. Shaggy is very independent but has started to follow me around the house sometimes. Shaggy is beginning to show improvement in being attentive and they are working on this at training. Shaggy loves the car and is an excellent passenger. She seems to be OK waiting in the car as well. Shaggy has separation anxiety and needs to see someone or know someone is close by. She will settle down in the crate if she sees someone is around, but if left alone in the crate she panics and will try very hard to get out. She doesn’t need to be with me specifically, she just needs to be with someone and goes off with other people very easily. Her anxiety seems to be about being alone and being in a crate. She would rather someone throw a ball than cuddle—it doesn’t matter who. As long as someone is playing with her and she is running around she is happy. Shaggy is beginning to settle down more easily when it’s time to relax. She will now lie on the floor near someone and stay in place longer. I think she will be a cuddler one day once she feels comfortable in her environment. Shaggy makes a good companion as she now shows interest in seeing where I am going and what I’m doing. Shaggy is a pleasant, happy girl and is beginning to learn how to be an inside dog. I do believe she will make a great dog and companion with the right set up. Medical History:  She is spayed, UTD on vaccinations, microchipped, and on HWP.  Shaggy is the picture of health. She is currently on trazodone and CBD oils for her separation anxiety. Comments:  Shaggy is a beautiful and happy dog. She is smart. Shaggy is very strong and needs to be trained to walk nicely on the leash, also needs to work on “come” when called. She doesn’t come immediately when called but should do fine with proper training. I believe she wants to please and is learning how and what is expected of her. Shaggy loves life, loves to play, and loves to eat. When she sits and looks at me, I know she wants to please. I feel the circumstances right now are hampering her development and she will soar into being a great dog with the proper treatment, training, and love. She is a looker! Location:  Cherryville, NC Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Shelby

Female Young English Setter Husky (mixed)
Socialization/training:  Shelby's anxiety has made it difficult to socialize her outside the home. Slow, short exposure in the home to n... show more
Socialization/training:  Shelby's anxiety has made it difficult to socialize her outside the home. Slow, short exposure in the home to new situations is best for Shelby. She has been exposed to children as young as 10 years of age. The children were instructed to ignore Shelby and Shelby was able to relax a bit. She does great with my male English Setter, but we have noted that when my setter has a play date with a very large German Shepherd, Shelby comes alive. She gets excited when she hears her friend coming up the walkway, barks and runs around in circles. In the yard Shelby seems to feel extra secure with her canine friend and then readily explores the yard. Shelby shares her toys and food with her canine friends. We have not noted any food aggression. Crate trained: Yes, Shelby easily goes into her crate at night to sleep. The crate seems to offer her some security.  Leash trained: No, Shelby is terrified of the leash. She will fall to the ground and refuse to walk. Activity Level: Shelby is a low energy dog. Fence: Shelby will absolutely require a hard fence. While Shelby has never challenged our stockade or chain link fences, the concern is that if she hears a loud noise she will bolt and hide. Shelby has not advanced to leash walking and is terrified to go outside of her comfort zone. It has taken Shelby several months to become accustomed to our fenced yard and to feeling somewhat safe in the yard. Initially Shelby, when taken outside to do her business, would choose to stay in a very small area of the yard. Now she walks around the yard; but, as soon as she hears an unexpected sound, she tucks tail and runs back inside the house.      Behavior: It is our belief that Shelby really wants to be a cuddler but is so fearful that, while she now will join my husband on the recliner to have her back rubbed, she does so for short periods of time and then goes back to her "safe couch". It must be noted that Shelby has progressed from being terrified, when someone unknown to her has come into the house she soiled herself, but now, she sits quietly on the "safe couch" and watches closely. We have had some success with telling our infrequent visitors to ignore Shelby completely. On her own, Shelby will slowly get off the couch and walk around a bit. She has not advanced to wanting anyone unknown to her to pet her. Shelby has improved a bit now that she is on a daily medication to help with her anxiety. What I like the most about Shelby happens in the morning as she gets so excited when she hears me getting up. This is when you get a glimpse of the dog Shelby could be. Shelby jumps on and off the couch and runs towards me multiple times and back to the couch. While doing this, she is “ rooing” and chattering her teeth. I think she is adorable when she does this. In these moments I have the most hope for Shelby's future. After a few minutes, inevitably Shelby seems to catch herself and goes back to quietly sitting and watching the day go by from the couch. Medical History:  Shelby has been very healthy while with us. She is microchipped, spayed, up to date on vaccinations, and on monthly heartworm prevention. She is due for her next leishmaniasis test in December of 2022 (she tested negative before coming to the States and again in December 2021). Shelby is on daily medication to manage her anxiety. The medication costs about $20.00 a month. Shelby is a good eater, so I put the pill in a bit of cheese and into her dog food without any issues. Shelby originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Shelby would do best in a quiet and calm home without children or a lot of visitors due to her anxiety. Shelby needs to be with a canine sibling who can be her mentor dog and give her confidence. She will need a patient home, where her fears will be effectively managed and she will be given time to make progress on her own and not be forced to do things she's not ready for. Due to her fears, we will only consider an adoptive home for her that is within a 500 mile radius of our home. Foster Location: Fall River, MA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
See details

Available - Teddy

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training: Teddy has not had formal training. He has learned to sit, and he is working on learning a down. We are working o... show more
Socialization/training: Teddy has not had formal training. He has learned to sit, and he is working on learning a down. We are working on leash walking. He is very social and gets along with all he meets. He does well in the dog park. He leaves the other dogs alone except for a quick sniff, then explores the area until it is time to go. He does not seem to have any fears. He has been approached and petted by kids of various ages and does fine. Small children may not be best fit as he does not like and will react if something is taken out of his mouth. House Trained:  He still has occasional accidents. He does well with consistency and close observation. Crate trained: Teddy eats in his crate and will spend time in his crate if he can see his humans. We are working on teaching him to spend alone time in his crate. He leans towards separation anxiety and likes to know where his humas are at all times. We are teaching him not to be vocal if he cannot see his favorite human. He can probably be trained to be in a crate but is much happier being with his family. Leash trained: This is a work in progress. He has come a long way. He will now walk by my side with a harness and a very short lead. He needs a few redirects to remember his job. He will pull when he sees another dog or cat. He can be stubborn and not pull off a strong smell. Activity Level: Teddy started out very independent and as he became comfortable in our home, he started to follow his favorite human everywhere. He sometimes flinches to an outstretched hand but as he trusts his human this goes away. He is very calm and will sleep at your feet all day, he loves his walk but is a relaxed guy. We have worked with him not to bark when he can not find his favorite human. At this point he does not get up on the furniture except for the “look out bench” that is available for the dogs to watch and wait for the humans to come home. Fence: A fenced yard is always a good idea as he likes to roam around. He would be fine with just leash walking. So far, he has not played chase or run around the yard with the other dogs in the home.    Behavior: He has a potential to be a cuddler. He does love to be always by your side and course wants to be pet whenever you are nearby. He loves to be brushed and groomed! So far he has not played with toys or the other dogs. He does love a good bone to chew on. He loves mealtime and is learning to work for food. Medical History:  Teddy is neutered, microchipped, and up to date on all his shots. He is current on monthly flea prevention and heart worm prevention. His next leishmaniasis test is due in May 2023. Teddy originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments:  Teddy is a relaxed boy that would be an amazing companion to someone who was home most of the day that wanted a dog to be a buddy. He will be someone’s best friend and follow them everywhere. Foster Location: Long Beach, CA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less