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Available - Bo

Male Adult English Setter
Socialization/training:  Bo is a sweet, polite, well socialized dog. His foster home reports he is one of the easiest foster dogs they’v... show more
Socialization/training:  Bo is a sweet, polite, well socialized dog. His foster home reports he is one of the easiest foster dogs they’ve had in 15 years of fostering. He adapts very quickly, respects the other dogs, and is a buddy to family members. He has gotten along fine with a 5-year-old human visiting in the home, but we feel he would do best in a calm home. He house-trained very quickly and can be left in the house unattended for periods of time. While inside he has a calm demeaner though if not exercised he can do some mischievous sock chewing. He loves to be with his people, and enjoys snuggling on the couch or bed. He has excellent manners with other dogs. Even the foster home’s grumpy senior female likes him. Bo is a trained, experienced hunting dog. He has been evaluated while in foster care and was found to have a good nose, holds a point, back points, stays close, and is not gun shy. He loves to hunt and would make an excellent hunting companion. He rides calmly in the car. Crate trained: Yes. Leash trained: Working on it. Activity Level: Bo has tremendous stamina in the field and loves to hunt. In his foster home, he has the opportunity to run unleashed twice a day on acreage and is in constant motion the whole time. He will be happiest having this kind of good, off leash running time every day. As with most setters, he is relaxed and calm in the house. This could be partly because he gets lots of daily exercise, but his general nature in the house is calm. Fencing:  The foster home has 4-foot fencing which works for Bo. As with any self-respecting setter, if given the opportunity (someone leaves a gate open) he will go out and explore. Our experience has been that he doesn’t go far and returns home. Medical History:  Bo is neutered, UTD on vaccinations, microchipped, on regular flea/tick medication and heart worm preventative. Bo stays on the thin side at 42-44 pounds. He is a fair eater but we are trying to find food that will put some weight on him. We suspect his high activity level keeps him trim. He has 3 current medical issues being treated:  (1) Bo came into rescue with very pink skin where his fur is sparser, such as on the stomach. He is believed to have a yeast infection and is currently being treated with 2 medications. His condition is improving but can take up to 6 months to completely clear up. He doesn’t scratch his skin, have hair loss, or seem bothered by it at all. It’s possible that if it doesn’t completely clear after 6 months that further testing will be needed. (2) Bo has been diagnosed with “dry eye”. This means he doesn’t make tears. If untreated it can be a painful condition. Bo receives eye drops 3 times per day and will need this medication for the rest of his life. He sits politely for the drops and waits for his treat at the end. The estimated cost of the eye drops is $30-$50 per month. (3) Once in October and to a lesser degree again in December, Bo experienced a change in behavior that puzzled 3 different veterinarians. His movement was slow, deliberate, and he would stay frozen in one position for long periods. It was finally discovered that he tested positive for anaplasmosis, a tick-borne disease. This diagnosis can have many manifestations, but we now believe it is the cause of his unusual behavior. He is being treated with a month of antibiotics and has had no more episodes. Foster Comments: As with most dogs in rescue, Bo had some guardian angels watching over him. We believe he lived his whole life in a kennel at a hunting camp. When he developed the treatable eye condition, he was going to be destroyed. Luckily, a local shelter worker intervened and brought him to the shelter where he was hidden because the shelter was full. When he was discovered, the outlook wasn’t good, but the shelter worker found A&B who stepped up to rescue this sweet soul. If Bo could talk, he would say how very grateful he is to all his rescuers. Bo has been a delight to have in our home. He loves affection and prefers to be in the vicinity of family when relaxing. He loves a good couch or bed! He’s simply a good buddy.  In conclusion: Bo’s foster family has known him for 4 months and is very impressed by his easy manner and sweet nature. We feel that in addition to the usual loving attention, vet care, etc., Bo will be happiest in a family that will provide him daily, vigorous exercise (leash walking around the block won’t do it), a comfortable couch, daily eye drops, and be generally attentive to medical needs. He would be so happy if he could hunt regularly. In return you will have a loyal, sweet, active, devoted family member. Bo is so worth it! Foster Location:  Waynesboro, Virginia Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Dias

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Dias came from Greece and spent much of his early life in a shelter after having been hit by a car and paralyze... show more
Socialization/training:  Dias came from Greece and spent much of his early life in a shelter after having been hit by a car and paralyzed in his hind end. Despite the tragedy in his life, Dias is a very happy and friendly dog. He doesn’t know he is “disabled” and it in no way diminishes his joy and love of life. His cheerful personality is one of his biggest charms. He loves people and will likely gravitate to one person who he will consider “his” person, although he is friendly and affectionate with everyone. He gets along well with the other dogs in his pack, but he does get excited (sometimes overly excited) and barks and chases them around when it is time to go outside. Most of the dogs ignore him when he gets rowdy and easily run away if he gets too close or annoys them. He just wants to play and be part of the pack, but they sometimes don’t understand him and don’t want to play with him as they would if he were a “normal” dog. Dias is very food motivated and should be easy to train to the extent that his physical limitations allow. Crate trained: Yes, Dias is crate trained. He sleeps in his crate and goes to his crate when he needs a time out as well as for treats and meals. He normally will bark if he realizes he needs to poop or if he has an accident while in his crate and he wants you to come help him. He generally is very good at staying away from any mess if he does happen to have an accident.  Housebroken: Dias will unfortunately never be housebroken in the traditional sense of the word because his severed spinal cord makes him unable to feel or physically control his bladder or his bowels. When his bladder and/or bowels reach capacity, then he just goes to the bathroom. Dias wears a belly band (diaper) when inside the house to keep things clean, and he is very good about wearing it. He can be induced to go outside by applying pressure to his bladder with gentle squeezing. Having a consistent schedule with Dias and helping induce him to go when you know its bathroom time will minimize him having accidents inside. His inability to control his bodily functions is perhaps the biggest challenge with a dog like Dias, but once you have established a rhythm and schedule, it is quite manageable. Leash trained: Dias has demonstrated an ability to be on a leash in the large yard while in his cart but we have not tried taking him for walks. Normally he is on a leash in his cart when going to or from the car for physical therapy. He can move surprisingly quickly in his wheelchair, so it would be wise to have him on leash outside of a safely fenced area. Good with kids/cats: There are no cats or children in Dias’s foster home, but he loves everyone and would probably be very good with kids and enjoy having them around. He might struggle with very young children simply because his physical diability makes him a bit uncoordinated and he might unintentionally knock over a baby or toddler. He has not demonstrated a prey drive other than chasing bugs, but he would likely view cats as playmates and might chase them looking to play. Cats could easily escape Dias though because of his physical challenges, so he would not be likely to present any risk to them. Activity Level:  Medium. While Dias cannot use his back legs, he is still a young Setter and one that wants to do all the things that other Setters do. His cart allows him to run with the other dogs and to burn off his energy. He can move quite fast in it and has become quite comfortable with it. He is also very capable of dragging himself across the ground with just his muscular front legs. He can run very fast on his front legs, but he needs to be in a drag bag or other protective clothing when dragging himself around because he can’t feel his legs and will create open sores from the rough ground. In the past, he has scraped up his back legs badly when running across pavement or other rough surfaces, and those wounds take time to heal. Once he is done stretching his front legs and expending his energy, he loves to lounge on a large pillow inside or in someone’s lap if they sit on the ground. He is very snuggly and just loves to be on someone or next to someone if given the opportunity. He is a huge cuddler and is happy to spend most of the day lying beside or near his person if he has the chance for a couple of runs in his wheelchair in the yard. Fence:  A fence is always preferred but Dias will not be a fence jumper. However, he can move quite quickly both in and out of his cart so a fence to contain him would be ideal. If he does not have a fenced yard, he will need multiple good walks because he is still an energetic young setter.     Behavior: Dias is a dog who has made lemonade out of the lemons he has been dealt in life. He is extremely happy and affectionate. He wants to be with his people and to enjoy their company. If not stretching his front legs outside, then he is happy to play with a toy on his pillow. If you give him the opportunity he will crawl into your lap and just lay there for hours. He is a normal young Setter who just happens to be mobility-impaired because his spinal cord was severed when he was hit by a car, and he has no neurological control from his waist down. Medical History:  Dias has a long medical history. He was found in the far northeastern part of Greece after he had been hit by a car twice and was left to die on the road. His back was broken, and his spinal cord was severed in the car accident, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down. When he arrived in the USA, he saw a neurological specialist to see if anything could be done for him surgically. Given the nature of the spinal fracture, the neurological surgeon concluded that there was no operation possible to reverse the paralysis. He has been to a veterinary rehab specialist as well, and he has exercises to keep his front legs strong and flexible and to limit muscle atrophy is his hind legs. He has been fitted for a new wheelchair and operates it comfortably and well. Dias has some very real physical limitations from the car accident, but he is otherwise healthy and in good condition. He is not in any pain and has many years of great quality of life ahead of him. We will share all his medical records and X-rays with any interested applicants. When Dias was found, he was also positive for Heartworm. He has completed his heartworm treatment and shows no signs or symptoms of any adverse effects from having had the parasite. He is on monthly heartworm prevention. He is also neutered, microchipped, and up to date on vaccinations. Dias had a negative leishmaniasis test before coming to the USA, as was his test in August 2021, but the disease can remain dormant for up to 7 years, so it is critical that he be tested annually for Leishmaniasis for the next 5 years. Dias is due for his next Leishmaniasis test in April 2023. Dias originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Dias is a wonderful boy with a real joy for life. He has so much love to give, and he wants nothing more than to be close to his people. He is happy to run around the yard in his cart or to lay by your side watching TV or reading for hours. He just wants to be close to his person, and he loves to cuddle. Because of his hind end paralysis, Dias will need a special family, but he will give that family all the love and happiness they could ever imagine. He has been through so much in his short life, but he is a testament to the power of positive attitude and a real inspiration. Foster Location: Temperance, MI Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Hannah

Female Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Hannah knows sit and wait. She’s very friendly and loves all dogs and children. She’s been very social at our l... show more
Socialization/training:  Hannah knows sit and wait. She’s very friendly and loves all dogs and children. She’s been very social at our local dog park, going up to people for attention and plays with other dogs. She’s well behaved indoors and loves to sleep in bed with you and cuddle on the couch. She loves tug of war and playing with other dogs. She’s a smart girl with lots of potential. She is a different dog once she’s outside. Very interested in hunting and tends to ignore you when trying to get her back inside. She WILL try to dart out the door and we have been working on that in foster care. Crate trained: Yes, she is crate trained and does well in a crate when you’re not home. We have left her out while gone for short periods and she’s been a good girl. She would however prefer to sleep with you in bed. Leash trained: She does tend to pull and wants to chase squirrels while on walks. Activity Level: She’s moderate when it comes to activity level. She enjoys being out for walks and playing in the yard and squirrel watching. When she comes in she enjoys playing with others dogs but also enjoys napping in the floor and on the couch with you. Fence: Hannah will need a physical fence (or possibly be trained with invisible fence). She’s small so I don’t believe she can jump a fence. She has a high prey drive and will take off, ignoring any recall. Her sole focus is to run around and do her own thing. I assume this comes from being on her own for who knows how long in Greece.  Behavior:  Hannah is a joy to have in our home. She was very timid when she came to us, cowering and had to be carried inside each time she went out. Cowering inside and afraid to move for days. She then slowly started coming out of her shell and now she fits in so well. She loves to cuddle and sleeps quietly in bed all night. She is playful and interested in all toys. Still shy at times but loves everyone. She learns routine pretty fast too, within a few weeks. She turns into another dog once she’s outside. She needs work on recall, she’s smart and food driven too. Medical History: Hannah is a healthy little girl with a huge appetite. She is spayed, microchipped, up to date on vaccinations, and on monthly heartworm prevention. Her next leishmaniasis test is due in November 2023. Hannah originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Hannah has won my heart and will be a hard one to let go of. She came to us scared of her own shadow and so unsure of everything. Watching her come out of her shell and seeing the amazing little girl she is has been so wonderful to watch. She deserves to be in a home where she’s able to flourish and continue to thrive. She would also do better with another dog in the home. A fenced in yard is a must and being able to sleep in bed with her people would make her very happy. Foster Location: Barrington, Illinois Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Jethro

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Jethro came from a shelter in Greece. He is a very social boy both with humans and other dogs. He welcomes visi... show more
Socialization/training:  Jethro came from a shelter in Greece. He is a very social boy both with humans and other dogs. He welcomes visitors into the home with enthusiasm. He has learned to sit for treats and is working on learning ‘down’ and ‘shake paw.’ He has good recall to his name most of the time. He learned the routine of the home rather quickly and confidently. Jethro was unsure of the resident dog at first because he seemed unable to read his reserved nature. He would do best with younger, bum wigglers like himself. He has a healthy curiosity and zest for life, so whether he is an only dog or has a dog pal, he would do best with an active family with some comings and goings in the household. Jethro is not sensitive to being touched or handled in any way. He readily lets you touch and wipe his paws, touch his tail and ears as well as enjoys being brushed and pampered. He is still working on his housebreaking and is starting to give cues when he wants to go outside. He does mark a lot in a new place so he will need to be supervised very closely in the beginning and taught where the door to outside is. He needs to be monitored around doors that do not lead to the yard as he will attempt to dart out or follow you out. Crate trained: Jethro is a very good boy when crated. He prefers to dine alone and will race you to his crate so he can hop in to receive his meal. He still sleeps in his crate overnight without issue and is still crated when home alone. He hasn’t quite figured out what to do with a treat-filled kong so he’s given a handful of treats and a munchy stick when put in the crate. He also enjoys nylabones or other hard chew toys when left alone. Jethro caught a slight cold early on and was on crate rest for a few days. He was so exceptionally good about it and would sometimes entertain himself by laying flat on his back with all 4 feet straight up in the air doing the running man and acting silly. Leash trained: Jethro still needs work on a leash. If you’re looking for a running buddy, Jethro is not your boy at this stage in his training. He takes his job as a bird dog very seriously and sees a walk as an opportunity to sight and pursue birds and other critters that cross his path. This is his main and only focus on walks and he will try to pull you in the direction of the bird or squirrel he has spotted. He does better on leash when given a lot of verbal feedback such as ‘heel’ and ‘good boy’ when walking nicely. Activity Level: Jethro’s activity is moderate to high when out in the yard. He loves to run throughout the yard searching for birds and checking on what the neighbors are up to. He loves to play fetch with a canvas wubba and will politely drop it at your feet for the next throw. He also loves to run laps with it in his mouth, shaking it and flipping it into the air. Jethro has a beautiful and graceful setter prance when he moves. Jethro would love to have another young dog to romp and play with outside. Once in the house, he morphs into a velcro lap dog. He will follow his human from room to room and is quick to claim a lap to snuggle in when they sit down. Jethro understands his human is not always able to devote all their attention to him and he will occupy himself with his toys. He loves hard chew toys and stuffies alike. He tries to engage the resident dog to play in the house but the resident dog doesn’t often oblige him. Jethro would likely play with a younger and willing participant in the house. Fence: Jethro can easily climb over a standard 4ft chain link fence in pursuit of a bird or squirrel. He really enjoys running around the yard on bird patrol as well as running with dog pals so a higher physical fence is needed to contain him safely in the yard, likely a privacy fence that can't be climbed so easily. Behavior: Our handsome boy Jethro is quite the looker but he’s just as beautiful on the inside. He’s very sweet and loves to snuggle but he also loves to play and be silly. Jethro is a social boy both with humans and other dogs. He loves interactive play with his person. He loves to go for walks however you’re really taking him on his daily critter patrol. He has not been introduced to cats but has demonstrated a high prey drive on walks. This may or may not translate to cats or other small animals in the home. It takes 10 mins for him to wind down once home and then he morphs back into a floof house dog and is ready for a nap. He loves to sprawl on his back when he sleeps. He loves to play with toys, lots and lots of toys. He likes to pounce on them and toss them so he can chase them. Jethro should be closely supervised with rope type toys as he does pull on and try to eat the strings. Jethro shares his toys but not so willing to share edibles, so he should be fed and treated separately from his dog pals. Jethro also eats very fast and will sometimes urp it up. A fun feeder or a 6- pack cupcake tin works well to slow him down. Jethro rides perfectly in the car and absolutely loves to go bye bye. He can barely contain his excitement when he knows he’s going on an outing. He’s also a very good boy at the vet. He’s a confident dog who is comfortable in new surroundings. He loves to go to the pet store where he can meet people and other dogs as well as take in all the glorious smells.  Medical History: Jethro is neutered, up to date on vaccines, and microchipped. He is on monthly heartworm prevention. His next Leishmaniasis test will be due in October 2023. Jethro originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Jethro will do best in a home with playful dog pals who he can romp and socialize with or as an only dog in an active family with opportunities to have doggy playdates. Jethro enjoys his time outside where he can run, play and patrol for critters. Jethro loves to snuggle with his human and will sprawl on his back and soon be fast asleep on your torso and legs if you happen to be a sprawler yourself. He also loves interactive play such as fetch or when his human interacts with him when he’s playing with toys inside. He doesn’t have to be on the go all of the time but he likes to keep busy and have things to occupy his time. Foster Location: Westland, Michigan Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Keko

Male Adult English Setter
Socialization/training:  Keko is nervous of new things. He is shy with new people but warms up quickly. The pet sitter has small childre... show more
Socialization/training:  Keko is nervous of new things. He is shy with new people but warms up quickly. The pet sitter has small children who join her sometimes and he does incredibly well with them. Knows “sit” and “come”. Keko lives with an extremely hyper-active young dog & puts up with her extremely well. He also lives with a grumpy geriatric dog who has made his disinterest known, Keko is very respectful of his space & submisses quickly. Keko also lives with a cat in his foster home and has shown great interest, in a disconcerting way. He has had multiple moments of face-to-face with said kitty with no negative consequences, so with training and management, he *MIGHT* be okay with cats in the future. Crate trained: Yes but he barks for a while when left alone. House trained: Many rescue dogs who have been kept in small, confined spaces struggle with potty training. Keko has taken some time as well. He is getting much better at letting his foster Mom know when he has to go outside. His forever family will have to be patient & learn his potty schedule to continue his house-breaking. Leash trained: Keko LOVES being outside and exploring. He clearly had NO positive leash training in his 7 years of life. He is slowly learning to make positive associations with leashes but still cowers when people reach for his collar. Foster Mom spent a long time just letting him learn to be happy as an indoor pet & not forcing leashed walks so this needs work.  Activity Level: Keko LOVES running around the backyard, looking for birds & squirrels. When inside, he loves to jump straight onto the couch for snuggles & scratches.  Fence: Keko needs a VERY secure 5’-6’ foot fence with NO holes! He is an escape artist and can fit through TINY holes. Behavior: If you look up “Love Bug” in the dictionary, you will see a picture of Keko. All he wants in the world is someone to pet and snuggle him. He is just nervous of new things/people and will need patience and someone to help him build confidence. He will also be found in the dictionary under the term “Velcro Dog” as he will be your shadow wherever you go in the house. Medical History:  Keko is neutered, microchipped, up to date on vaccines, and on monthly heartworm prevention. He has what is likely a past strain injury to his right knee and he takes joint supplements to help with that but otherwise he is very healthy. His next leishmaniasis test is due in August 2023. Keko originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Keko is handsome and he knows it, a total ham when he warms up to you with the cutest setter roos! Just try to resist his smolder! He LOVES a couch and is a huge snuggle-bug! It is obvious his past life was very scary. He gets nervous and fearful of most new things (people, harnesses, leashes, places) so needs a stable and predictable home environment with gentle and patient humans. I focused on making him feel safe and secure so I took training very slowly with him. He is a very sweet, loving dog who wants to please; he is a wonderful, wonderful dog. Foster Location: Cleveland, Ohio Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Stella/Nova

Female Puppy English Setter (mixed)
Socialization/training:  Stella has not received any formal training that we know of but did come to us socialized and comfortable with... show more
Socialization/training:  Stella has not received any formal training that we know of but did come to us socialized and comfortable with other animals. Upon arrival, she was hesitant and timid until she met our Setter/Brittany mix Hazel. We have not witnessed any aggressiveness aside from the usual puppy play and exploration. We also have two house cats, one of which is a young 16 year-old. Stella is curious and will follow them around but leaves them alone when told “no” and/ or “leave it”. We have already gotten her to understand and perform sit and leave it at mealtimes and to wait patiently for treats. Crate trained: Unknown, but probably no. We have a crate set up, but thankfully it has not been needed. She has had free run of our house aside from closed off rooms that are not in use or she has no business being in. At night she has had free roam with no issues. Leash trained: No. Stella will need leash training. Activity Level:  Mixed. She goes through playful spurts normal for a puppy and then can quickly settle down and cuddle on the couch, relax on the floor or explore the basket of toys. She has become quite adept at emptying the whole basket looking for that right chew piece for the moment. We think she would prefer a home with another four-legged friend of equal energy and activity level. She should also do fine as an only dog but would require her human companions to stimulate and keep her positively engaged. Fence:  REQUIRED. We have standard 6-foot privacy fences on the sides and 6-foot wrought iron fences on the front and rear of our small lot. She can jump shorter barriers, so needs a home with a 6 foot fence.  She is nature curious and would probably follow the squirrels or birds so a hard fence should be a requirement. She loves to run when outside and she is let out many times throughout the day and she also does not have a good recall as she is easily distracted or may at times get scared, so the fence is also needed for her own safety.   Behavior:  Stella is a very kind and loving puppy. It is obvious she has experienced trauma in her young life and aims to please. She has not been aggressive to us, houseguests, or other pets in the home at all. She can be quite reserved and timid, but once acclimated and comfortable she is truly a pleasure to have around. She loves to play one minute and is quite content the next to curl up next to you on the couch or bed. She occupies herself with toys and is quite humorous to watch tossing them around and play “growling”. We moved our backyard camera into the house to observe her when we are away and have had next to no issues if she has access to plenty of chew toys to keep her curious mind busy. Medical History: Stella is spayed, microchipped, up to date on vaccinates, and on monthly heartworm prevetion. Stella was underweight when we got her and has been gaining weight on her puppy food. She did have an ear infection and Giardia but has since been successfully treated for both. Her next leishmaniasis test is due in November 2023. Stella originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250 or if your vet is willing to send the test to a veterinary college lab, cost can be as low as $80. Foster Comments: Stella is a gentle, loving, and dedicated companion. We have yet to see a mean bone in her body. In a few short weeks she has acclimated just fine and will provide the right family with decades of loyal companionship. The only negative we can list for Stella is that she has a very thick coat that will require frequent brushing to keep the hair down in your home. She is very smart and has learned commands, routines, and off limit items/areas with ease. We cannot say enough great things about this gorgeous Greek! Foster Location: Boerne, Texas Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Courtesy Post: Sea & Beach (Bonded Pair)

Female Young English Setter
Sea & Beach are in the care of Tattered Paws Golden Hearts Rescue. If interested, please visit their website for an application. https:/... show more
Sea & Beach are in the care of Tattered Paws Golden Hearts Rescue. If interested, please visit their website for an application. https://www.tatteredpaws.com/applications.php?p=adopt Sea & Beach are a bonded pair of sisters who are looking for a home where they can stay together forever. Double the fun!! Socialization/training:  Sea and Beach arrived from Turkey just before Christmas and are still decompressing, so have not done much yet in the way of training. However, they are very chill dogs and have taken to the indoor life very well. They are couch potatoes inside and still gaining confidence with having freedom to run outside. Crate trained: Yes – they do well in a crate together. They have not been crated separately. Leash trained: Not quite. They do pull on leash, so will need patience & practice to be proficient on a leash House training: I would say that Sea is potty trained. Beach not so much. When she has an accident, it's generally my fault for not taking her out soon enough or I just haven't figured out her cadence yet. She needs to go every 3 hours exactly. Any sooner and she won't go outside. Any later and she WILL go inside. They will generally bark to let you know they need to go poop. Activity Level: Very laid back – these girls are angels in the house. No issues with chewing/destruction. They free roam and do very well. Fence: Yes, a fence is required. Because they are not leash walking trained yet, an adopter should have a fenced in yard for them to run.    Behavior: Super cuddly and snuggly with people and each other. They are couch potatoes in the house. Medical History: Both dogs are up to date on vaccinations, microchipped, & spayed. We are working through a couple medical things at the moment. Sea has a UTI - she is on antibiotics for 10 days. (will be completed on 1/15/22) Beach urine will be tested today (1/9/22) and if she also has a UTI as well will also start a 10 day round of antibiotics. Beach has a lump on her chest -we are waiting on the results to tell us what it is. We should have the results by end of this week. They both had ear infections and have been given a 1 time antibiotic that lasts for a month. Their ears can't get wet for a month, which will end on 2/5/22. Foster Comments: They are the absolute best girls. They are very chill in the house. Totally ignore my cats. Are so gentle and would be great with kids. They are counter surfers and will demand bark when you're not fast enough at getting their food ready.😂 They pull on leash because their setter hunting instinct comes out when on a walk. I haven't seen any leash reactivity at all to other dogs or people. Sea likes to run around outside in my fenced yard. Beach is just starting to feel adventurous enough to run. Sea barks when she gets excited. I think she doesn't quite know what to do with all this freedom yet.🥰 When we try to get Beach to run around, she will generally want to run right back to the door to go inside. Part of me wonders if she is worried she won't be let back in since she spent so much of her life outdoors and she just loves to coziness of a warm home so much. They are absolute snuggle bug dolls. They attach to their people and seek comfort and guidance from them. They are very submissive and get scared/overwhelmed by aggressive or wild play with other dogs. They do get carsick and have already been on 3 flights, so we are looking for an adopter in the PNW within reasonable driving distance. Foster Location: Woodinville, WA (greater Seattle area) show less