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Available - Asteris

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Joggers need not apply! (See medical history comments) Asteris takes things slow…unless you have a treat. He’ll... show more
Socialization/training:  Joggers need not apply! (See medical history comments) Asteris takes things slow…unless you have a treat. He’ll pick up the pace for those. Asteris loves people, kids, dogs, toys and treats! Crate trained: Yes, he sleeps in his crate during the night on a comfy bed and is crated when we go out. He’ll occasionally nap in his crate if the door is open. Leash trained: Yes, short and slow walks is what this guy prefers Activity Level: Asteris is a gentle laidback guy that is looking for the next belly rub or treat. He does likes to play with toys in the house. Fence:   A fence is not required. He loves to roam around the back yard, nap on the patio and play with a tennis ball.  Behavior: He will stand/sit by your side till your hand gets tired from petting him. He loves to be brushed too. Medical History: His Greek rescuers believe he was either kicked or hit on his hind right leg. It’s a bit crooked (never flat on the ground while resting) but doesn’t cause him any pain. He was also 10-15 pounds underweight. Asteris is current on heartworm/flea/tick prevention and up to date with vaccines. He is neutered and microchipped. His next leishmaniasis test is due in May 2022. Asteris originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: Asteris is a sweet, lovable guy looking for some love, a soft place to rest his head at night and some treats!  He hasn’t met a soft dog bed he didn’t like. He has a gallop like run and will run to you for his morning brushings. Since he put on some weight is coat is now shiny and soft. Asteris means “star” in Greek. He’s looking for a home where he can shine his brightest! Foster Location: Schaumburg, IL Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Braxton

Male Young English Setter (mixed)
Socialization/training: It took a very long time for Braxton to trust us enough to even come into the house. He had little socialization... show more
Socialization/training: It took a very long time for Braxton to trust us enough to even come into the house. He had little socialization as a pup in Greece. He has come to love our family. He’s hesitant about fast movements and unfamiliar people or things. If he gets scared, he barks or runs out the doggie door. He will need a family that can be very patient with him, and allow him to bond in his own time. We recommend no young children. He’s finally comfortable with our nearly 10 year old granddaughter, who lives with us. Until he is comfortable, he should remain on a leash or in a small fenced yard. (We had trouble because we have nearly 3 acres in an Invisible Fence, so we couldn’t catch him.) He learns a lot from other dogs in the family, and loves to play with other dogs. He would prefer to have another dog to play with and imitate. Crate trained:  Unknown Leash trained: Walks well on leash. Activity Level:  Playful, loves to run and chase squirrels. Inside he likes to rest in dog beds or on the couch. Very timid around anything he doesn’t understand. Fence: Either a hard fence or an Invisible Fence is needed. He’s trained to an Invisible Fence. Behavior: Braxton steals your heart. He loves his “good mornings” and chest rubs. He prefers to get attention when he’s sitting on a couch or dog bed, except he competes with our other dogs for “good morning” scratches and belly rubs. He’s energetic outside. He likes to shred stuffies, shoes and other things. He LOVES to play outside with our other dogs. He is very observant of the things the other dogs do, and has learned a lot from them. He occasionally cuddles, but that’s a thing that he’s still getting used to. (Remember, he had minimal socialization as a young dog, so he’s making up for lost time.) Medical History: Braxton is healthy, neutered, UTD on vaccinations, microchipped, and on HWP. Braxton originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments:   Braxton is a great dog! We want to make sure he gets placed in the right home. We will not consider applications from families with very young children or from families with no other dogs. We suspect he wouldn’t do well with cats. He must have a family that will give him space and time to adjust. He has proven that he can adjust to living in a home with a family, and likes the comfort of home, especially dog beds, couches, biscuits and regular meals. Foster location: New Haven, Vermont Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters and foster home.  If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection ("Health Certificate").  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1,000-mile transport distance: however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1,000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog.  Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states may have additiona restrictions. show less
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Available - Casey/Shaggy

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Casey sits and stays while waiting for his food bowl at mealtime. He sits/stays for treats too. Needs a lot of... show more
Socialization/training:  Casey sits and stays while waiting for his food bowl at mealtime. He sits/stays for treats too. Needs a lot of work on recall/come. Casey will jump on you when he is excited to see you when you come home from being away. Crate trained: No. Casey has separation anxiety and is very agitated inside the crate for any length of time. He cries instantly and rubs his nose on the crate and makes it bleed. Leash trained: Does fairly well, but when on the leash in the yard Casey sometimes pulls quickly going after game that he sees. On bathroom trips it sometimes takes 15/20 minutes for him to go when on leash, he is more interested in “hunting” and “watching for animals/game”. Casey has walked very well on the leash for 4 to 5 mile walks with the resident dogs around the local University, in town, around people, and car traffic, etc. When approached by another person with a dog on the path, Casey is sometimes a bit nervous about passing them, but never aggressive. Activity Level: High activity level. Casey is a natural hunter, and loves to hunt and point at game when outside. He loves to run and smell/hunt. Does not seem to have any interest in playing with other dogs. Fence: Casey would do better with a physical fence as he loves to run and search for game. He needs a lot of work on recall, and would not be trusted to run loose off leash. Behavior: Independent when it comes to other dogs, but craves human attention; petting, cuddles on the couch and snuggling in bed. Inside the house, he is definitely all about being close to his human companions. Medical History: Up to date on distemper and rabies vaccinations, monthly heartworm medication and flea/tick medication. Casey was treated for tapeworms on 04/06/21. He is neutered and microchipped.     Foster Comments: With the correct training, Casey would be an excellent candidate for an upland bird dog. His natural pointing and “focus” ability is very strong. “Anytime” and “all the time” while Casey is outside, he is in “hunting mode”. He is independent with other dogs, so he would do well in a home as a single dog. But if the home has other dogs, they get along socially very well but Casey has little interest in other dogs’ attention. He craves human attention.   Foster Location: Slippery Rock, PA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Duke

Male Senior English Setter
Crate trained: Yes, sleeps through the night and goes in on his own to rest. Leash trained: Yes but also walks with me off leash around... show more
Crate trained: Yes, sleeps through the night and goes in on his own to rest. Leash trained: Yes but also walks with me off leash around the property- not at first though- he was a flight risk until he settled in. Activity Level: Duke is on the quiet side but will play for short burst with our other dogs. Fence: Physical fence preferred, but he would also do well being leash walked daily or taken to doggie daycare. Behavior: He is a cuddler. He loves to be close to you, he will lay at your feet any chance he has, sit next to the table at dinner- does not beg just wants to be close. Medical History: Heartworm negative, neutered recently. He is up to date on vaccinations, microchipped, and on monthly heartworm prevention. Foster Comments: Duke’s owner had five Setters, he was a breeding dog, I believe. He lived with his owner, his owner's sister, some older dogs and three young dogs. I had been told his owner had a serious heart attack and the sister couldn't care for all of the dogs, so they relinquished the dogs to a local rescue who has worked with A&B in the past.  They reached out to Above & Beyond to find foster homes for the 5 setters who were relinquished.  He settled with us quickly, learned our routine quickly, and loves to be loved on. He is very chill. He goes to doggy day care three times a week when I am at work and has a few small dogs he likes to hang out with a play with. The staff there love him too. He needs help loading into the Jeep since he is a grandpa dog. He eats well, can, dried and often I make a mixed vegetable, ground turkey and barley stew to put over dry science diet. It is actually healthier and cheaper for me to do this over $2.25 a can for Science Diet. Foster Location: Gunnison, CO Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Falcor

Male Young Labrador Retriever German Shorthaired Pointer (mixed)
Socialization/training:  Knows basic commands, we are working on shake & he can catch treats in his mouth, house trained, good with othe... show more
Socialization/training:  Knows basic commands, we are working on shake & he can catch treats in his mouth, house trained, good with other dogs & people Crate trained:  Yes to eat & for a few hours but doesn’t do well for more than 4 hours needs enrichment (bones & toys) Leash trained: Yes, walks well on leash. Activity Level: Energetic young pup so needs exercise, & continued holistic training, very playful with other dogs & people, likes to run fenced yard & go on 2 daily walks. Enjoys cuddling with his person.   Fence: Five foot or higher physical fence preferred. Behavior: Falcor is a super friendly cuddly sweet pup. He prefers to be by his persons side every minute he can except when he takes a break to play with the other dogs. He likes to run with his foster dog sibling in the yard & then comes in to cuddle on the couch. Medical History:  Falcor is deaf but otherwise he is healthy and up to date on vaccinations and heartworm preventative. He is microchipped and neutered. A DNA test was done & came back with German Shorthair Pointer, Lab, & Boxer. Maybe even a teeny bit of Bernese Mountain Dog. An all around 100% hunk of preciousness. 😊 Foster Comments: Falcor is an outgoing, young, energetic boy that is super affectionate, friendly, smart, & loves everyone he meets.  Rumor is he had a rough start in life when he was locked in a shed for 5 months, so it makes sense that he does not like to be alone too long.  He needs a home where he will not be left alone more than 4 hours each day & preferably with another dog friend to play with since he likes to run & play in the yard.  He was a bit pushy when initially making friends with the other 4 dogs in the house but the older dogs are teaching him doggy manners.  He is a persistent but irresistible pup & will finds a way to make friends with every person & dog he meets.   People say dogs don’t like to be hugged but they obviously haven’t met Falcor. He likes to play ball & tug a war.  He hasn’t chewed anything he’s not supposed to except a dish towel so we worked on no counter surfing and he has lots of bones & chew toys to keep him occupied.  DNA test says he is part German Shorthair Pointer]\Bernese Mountain with some Boxer\Labrador Retriever mixed in.  Falcor has a super soft coat, beautiful yellow\brown eyes, & is possibly albino so a pink nose & skin.  Falcor is deaf so I use hand signals but he is easy to communicate with & not afraid of the vacuum, storms, or loud noises.  He likes to ride in the car & enjoys his trips to town saying hello to everyone he meets.  If you are looking for a fun, friendly, sweet dog that will stick by your side Falcor could be the dog for you. Foster Location: Bandera, TX Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Fiat

Male Young English Setter Great Dane/Husky (mixed)
Socialization/training: Fiat entered the kennel in Greece as a small pup. Covid hit and the volunteers were unable to socialize him. He... show more
Socialization/training: Fiat entered the kennel in Greece as a small pup. Covid hit and the volunteers were unable to socialize him. He basically got fed for a year with no other interaction.  He has come a long way but is still shy of people and strangers.  He prefers men without facial hair. Crate trained: Yes Leash trained: He does OK on a short lead but needs work. When he first arrived he would run in circles (always  counterclockwise) and twist the lead til half its length. I usually have him on a long lead now so that he can run and when outside I drop the lead so he can sprint in the yard. Activity Level: He is a mixture of both. Very calm inside around people he is comfortable with or he will hide in a “safe spot” around strangers (usually anyone other than myself). He loves being outside playing with the other dogs, hunting squirrels in the pecan trees and running  like the wind. He will have bursts of play energy inside. Fence: He is almost trained to an invidible fence but I never let him out without a long lead. He has let the squirrels next door tempt him through the line. Some sort of fence is preferred but not required.  Behavior: He is very independent but this may be due to his lack of socialization as a pup. He does like to sit next to me on the sofa but he is also fine with sitting on the other end by himself or in his safe corner depending on who is in the room. He loves to sleep on the bed and will snuggle up close. He loves  playing on the bed with me or his doggy siblings. He sleeps throughout the night until I get up at 7-7:30 AM. He rarely comes to me asking for attention but will accept attention when given to him. He is improving along these lines. .When outside, if someone he doesn’t know comes up he will circle us barking making smaller and smaller circles until he can sniff the person. If we are sitting on the screen porch he will slowly approach and sniff and maybe let another person touch him.  Medical History:  Fiat had some GI issues when he first arrived but those have all cleared up. He is neutered, microchipped, on Sentinel for HWP and UTD on vaccinations. His microchip has migrated down his left  front leg and you can feel it when you rub down his shoulder towards his elbow. It’s not medical but he has dew claws on all legs so remember to clip them when he has a pedicure. Fiat originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: Fiat is from Greece. He and his 3 siblings were found as strays when they were about 4 weeks old. They were rescued to a kennel but Covid hit and our volunteers could not visit to socialize the pups. It seems that all he got for almost a year was food and very little human contact. He is a sweet little guy who has made a lot of progress since Santa brought him on Christmas Eve 2020. He is still very scared of other people especially men with facial hair. My son, who is clean shaven, visited and Fiat did better around him so my husband has shaved. While more accepting of Andy, Fiat is still scared of him. Fiat will sit by me or on the other end of the sofa to watch TV when Andy is in the room. He prefers his safe spot in the open doored kennel in the computer room and has found a corner behind a chair when in the other part of the house. He will also spend time on the bed or the sofa depending on which room he is in. He normally eats in the computer room due to not being comfortable throughout the house but I have gotten him to eat in the kitchen a few times. He eats around the other dogs with no aggression. He sits nicely and eats treats with the other dogs although treats are still new and he can be hesitant to actually eat them. He is a little possessive of his chew bone or toys and will tell the other dogs to leave him alone but we have never had any physical confrontations. The closest we’ve had is when my son’s puppy wouldn’t accept “no stay away” signals from Fiat but Fiat handled it appropriately. He plays well with my dogs and loves to chase with them in the yard. Inside play is somewhat limited unless on top of the bed! We have 2-3 acres within an invisible fence. When we go outside Fiat drags a 60’ lead. He is mainly trained to the fence but he does have a great squirrel drive and has broken through the fence to chase. He hasn’t gone far and the lead makes him easy to retrieve. When I tell him it’s time to “go inside” he will run to the door and wait for me to let him in.  He sleeps in the bed with me. He will snuggle close or move to the foot of the bed. He sleeps all night  long and will stay quiet until I get up around 7-7:30 (even if I have to get up in the middle of the night.) If I try to catch up on emails on the phone before getting out of bed he will give me kisses in the ear and likes to play on the bed in the AM. As soon as I am vertical, he becomes more cautious. He will come to me for attention but that is not the norm. He accepts all of the attention I bring to him. He sleeps through thunderstorms but will startle with loud/sharp/unusual noises and sudden movements during the daytime. He does well at the groomer’s except that he is petrified of the blow dryer and will panic. Towel dries only. He loves to “load up” in the car but needs encouragement to get out of the car. He rides well in the back seat, sometimes he will put his head between the seats or ride shotgun. We went to Tractor Supply the other day and he was calm. He let a man in line offer him a treat (which he didn’t eat) and we went to the beach, a new scary place.  One thing I have noticed is that when we have company and there is a lot of confusion, Fiat “comes out” of that occasion doing better but when things revert to the quiet of just Andy and I, he takes a step back. So it is possible that a busier household would help him adjust. We just don’t have that to offer him since we live in the country and do not run the TV or radio continually. He really is a sweet guy. His hair has gotten longer and scruffier giving him such appeal. His little fu manchu (or catfish whiskers)is so cute. He will need a family with a lot of love and patience. He prefers females but I can’t rule out a patient man, older children might be OK but again they would need to be patient for him to learn them. He enjoys other dogs but that is not a requirement. Foster Location:  Edisto Island, SC Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Nolan

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Nolan has not had any specific training in his foster home. We have been focused on helping alleviate his fears... show more
Socialization/training:  Nolan has not had any specific training in his foster home. We have been focused on helping alleviate his fears and get him to trust us not to hurt him and to feel comfortable with people. He has a generally very happy and loving nature and has been generally well behaved. He does not chew on inappropriate things or steal food (although he’d probably take it if you left it sitting out), but he does jump up when he gets excited. He also dashes out the door as soon as it is opened, so his new family will need to work on containing his enthusiasm and getting him to wait at the door before rushing out. Crate trained: Yes. Nolan goes readily into his crate for meals and for a treat and he sleeps comfortably in his crate overnight. Once he is finished with his meal and when he wakes up in the morning, he is ready to come out and will bark to let you know it. If he knows you are home and he wants out of his crate, he will let you know it! He does settle down when no one is home and takes a nap there, but he prefers to be on the couch or near your feet. Housebroken: Mostly housebroken, but not 100%. Nolan never has accidents in his crate, but he will occasionally have one near the door if you don’t catch his signals that he needs to go out. Leash trained: Not really. Nolan is still quite fearful of new places, noises and situations. Cars scare him, and when he is afraid, he just lays down and won’t move. He does not pull on the leash and will walk nicely on it in the large back yard, but when I have tried to take him on walks down the street, he gets scared and lays down and I have had to carry him home. It will take time and patience to overcome the fear. He would likely be fine on leash walks in the woods or countryside because it is not the leash that is the problem, but the other scary things around him. Good with Children: Nolan does not have any children in his foster home. He is very hand shy and startles with loud noises, so he would probably not do well with very loud or erratic small children. A couple of school aged children (10 & 12 years old) came to visit and he was happy to get attention and petting from them, but they are very dog savvy kids. Activity Level: Nolan is a very energetic boy. He LOVES to RUN in the backyard and chase the birds and butterflies. He has a lot of stamina and can run very fast – it is a beautiful sight to see and he has a gorgeous flowing stride. Nolan definitely needs a home where he can expend his energy. A large yard or frequent trips to a park where he can run free will be important for him. Once he has had a good run, he is happy to come inside and cuddle with his people and he will settle down nicely for a while… then he’s ready for another spin around the yard. Fence: ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED. Nolan is energetic and loves to run, but because of his fears, leash walking (even leash running) is not really a possibility for him, so he needs a secure place to burn off steam. He has demonstrated (much to his foster mom’s dismay) that he can climb a 5 foot chain link fence, so he needs a privacy fence or an iron/aluminum fence – one that is not climbable. Behavior: Nolan still has a lot of fears, but he is also very loving and desperate for affection and attention. He is living with a large group of other dogs and will sometimes play with them, but he is most eager to be with his human. He is a very energetic young boy and will need an active and patient family to help him burn off his energy. He generally listens quite well, responds to his name, and is very sensitive to the reactions of his people. Medical History:  Nolan is up to date on all his shots and is healthy. He did have an ear infection when he arrived, but that has cleared up. He also had an intestinal bacteria called Campylobacter and is on medication to treat that. He should be done with his treatment around the end of June. Nolan also had a few bad teeth causing some gum disease and had to have an extraction. His dental went well, and his teeth are now nice and white.  All his blood tests for parasites were negative. He is neutered, microchipped, and on monthly heartworm prevention. He is due for his next leishmaniasis test in April of 2022. Nolan originates from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: Nolan came to rescue when the hunter who owned him and 4 other setters passed away. His family did not want the dogs and planned to abandon them on the mountain nearby. A rescue friend of ours contacted us, and we brought them in. Based on his reactions, I think Nolan was treated harshly because he is very hand shy. He shrinks away from any hand that is held over his head – even with people he trusts, and he will not take food from your hand while in his crate … and very reluctantly and cautiously outside his crate (if at all). At the same time, he is one of the most loving dogs you will ever meet and is so desperate for love and affection. If you reach out to him and stroke under his chin then start petting him, he leans into you with a huge smile, and his entire boy wags. He loves to sit on the couch beside you and burrow into you. He can be a little jealous of other dogs when he is getting attention from his person, but nothing comes of it, and we are working on correcting that behavior.  Nolan is a happy and loving boy who is learning to trust and feel safe. He sometimes struggles to curb his enthusiasm, so he will need a family who is willing to work with him on very gentle training. When he is running in the yard or playing in the living room with his family, he is so full of joy. Foster Location: Temperance, MI Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Oreo

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Oreo is an anxious dog but has come a long way since his arrival in foster. He knows his name and will listen i... show more
Socialization/training:  Oreo is an anxious dog but has come a long way since his arrival in foster. He knows his name and will listen in the house if there no distractions. He will sit and give his paw. Oreo was surrendered by his former owner in very rural VA and came to foster in suburban Phila. The increase in visual and audible stimulation was a lot for him and he would bark at everything. He has calmed down immensely but still will have bouts of doggie ADHD and not listen or come if distracted by noise or too many people while outside. He chases cars and bicycles along the fence line and he sees it as his job to guard the homestead by barking an alert about all passerby.  Crate trained: No, he definitely didn’t want to go into the crate when he arrived. It was left out and open to see if he decided to use it and after several months he never did. He prefers dog beds. I kept him separately closed in the laundry room at night for a couple of months and when I was sure there would not be a dust up with the resident dog and cat it was no longer necessary.  Leash trained: Very strong puller but LOVES to walk. Activity Level: Oreo was HW+ when he came into Rescue so his normal activity was minimal. As he has recovered he is getting much more energetic and now he plays “let’s chase and tussle” with the resident dog. He doesn’t need to run laps but enjoys being able to stretch his legs and explore. When he does run he sometimes has a hop in his back legs and the groomer also noted how he moved to sit, as if he was stiff or had a prior injury. Fence: Secure physical fence required. Not a candidate for an invisible fence. A 4ft fence is sufficient as he has shown no desire to jump mine. The surrendering owner noted he was a digger but I have not seen that and my fence can’t be dug under. He has not been a jumper nor a climber, inside or out. Behavior: If I could be a two dog household I’d keep Oreo, he’s that loving and I’ve come to understand his needs and quirks. He had a couple of accidents when he first arrived and when he was on prednisone, but is housebroken and goes to the door to be let out. He reaches for the doorknob and rings the bell. Oreo is a cautious and anxious dog, but nowhere near as anxious as he was when he arrived. He does not jump on furniture but will lie at your feet or somewhere close where he can see and adore you. He will jump up for a hug, or come to you when you are seated, leaning on you for hugs and pets and scratches. He loves to lie on the deck and look at the world, so long as the world isn’t too hectic. The move from rural to semi-urban was sensory overload as he barked at every person or vehicle that went by, every plane that flew over or rapid transit trolley that he could see go by. He is now accustomed to the noise of the area, but one thing he still does is chase cars or kids on bikes that pass by on the other side of our fence, barking aggressively. Until he came to my home he had not experienced inside stairs and it took two months until he overcame his fear and came up the steps from the basement to the kitchen. Then with his confidence in place he happily climbed the uncarpeted stairs from the first floor to the second floor so he could lie close and watch me work. Until the day he slipped on the uncarpeted steps and now he does not attempt them anymore. He doesn’t like large expanses of hard floor as his legs may splay, and he will whimper with his back legs firmly planted on some carpet until he gets up the guts to walk, then he scampers. He still sometimes gets confused about his feet on the steps, he’ll whimper and then take it on. He’s totally fine with a few steps, e.g. six from the yard onto the deck, but a full flight of non-carpeted steps is scary to him. While outside he guards the house from everyone on the outside of the fence, even if he has seen someone many, many times. But once welcomed inside the gate or into the house, you are accepted as OK and belonging, however all persons need to wait for Oreo to approach them, don’t approach him or invade his space; when he is ready he will come to meet you. I credit my resident dog with helping to socialize Oreo. From the time he arrived, she tried to initiate play and he wasn’t having any of it (fear) and she let him be but would try again in a day or two. Eventually he started to play a little bit at a time, and now they play all the time, tug, chase, wrestle, zoomies. Visits to the vet, and most recently to the groomer, bring back Oreo’s anxiety over new things, but once home, leave him alone and he will recover to his self. I anticipate that any move will set him back, so his adoptive home has to be ready to give him the time and the space to feel safe and not force anything Medical History:  UTD on all shots and on HWP. Oreo was HW+ and began treatment. On the second round of shots he had a medical reaction (not allergic) and the vet would not proceed with the 3rd shot. The vet believes that since he has had 2 of the 3 shots and been on HWP, with his original HW diagnosis being lower grade that he should be clear when tested after 6 months. Oreo had a Cytopoint injection for allergies when he was surrendered. His allergies have been controlled by a diet of Purina Pro-Plan Lamb and Rice and by sharing my generic Claritin with him every morning. Foster Comments: Oreo is a sweet boy who wants to love and be loved. Three things are important to me for Oreo’s safety and happiness: a securely fenced yard; a one story or split level home with minimal steps and not large expanses of hard flooring with no area rugs or carpeting; and an environment no more noisy or busy than mine to limit over stimulation and anxiety. It is important to keep his nails trimmed and his paw pads free of fur to ensure he feels safe and doesn’t slip when he walks on hard surfaces.    It took a couple of months for Oreo to decide that the resident dog would be a friend and since he made that decision they have a great time together. Oreo is picky about his dog friends, he absolutely HATES the smaller older dog next door but can’t wait to see the bigger dog two doors away and they bark back and forth to each other happily. As written previously, Oreo guards the home outside.  It doesn’t matter how many times he has seen the neighbors over the past several months, he barks the danger alert about them being outside the fence and will not calm down to allow them to pet him. Foster location: Havertown, PA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters and foster home.  If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection ("Health Certificate").  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1,000-mile transport distance: however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1,000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog.  Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states may have additiona restrictions. show less
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Available - River

Male Young English Setter Flat-Coated Retriever (mixed)
Housebroken: We have a dog door that allows the dogs to go in and out whenever they wish. Bells hang on the back door and we use them to... show more
Housebroken: We have a dog door that allows the dogs to go in and out whenever they wish. Bells hang on the back door and we use them to help train until the dog masters using the dog door. River uses the dog door but will bark to let us know he needs to go out when crated or gated. Gets along with dogs/kids/cats: River likes people BUT is reactive to touch on his back paws and legs. Removing an object he should not have or moving too close to his food dish can trigger an outburst. River should not be in a home with younger children, nor older children -16 and above - who are not very dog savvy. We feel he may do bodily harm to cats or other small animals he may see as prey. Not recommended to go to a home with them. Socialization/training:  River is friendly to all the other dogs, meets new dogs well and likes to hug people. He is not shy, loves to be petted, gives kisses, rides well and enjoys going to pet friendly stores. Body language will change when River is feeling uncomfortable being touched so paying attention is necessary. We are working on River learning to move away as a choice when he feels unsure. River knows basic commands and is gentle taking treats. He does get excited and is a little impatient for the first treat but settles down quickly to wait his turn. The biggest challenge River has is trusting. Once you have built trust with him, he wants to be in your lap and have his belly rubbed, snuggle with you and will give you his front paws. Crate trained: River is crate trained. We do not crate him when we are away as he is fine with the other dogs and is not a danger to himself in the house. Recently we have begun to find couch pillows, a throw blanket or dog bed cover, bones, many dog toys and assorted things out in the yard when we come home after an absence of more than a few hours. As there are currently 9 dogs total at our house, we can’t place the thefts on any particular dog/s. The items are not destroyed, just relocated! River loves toys and will take them one by one to put in a pile. We suspect he lacked possessions in his previous lifetime as he is so joyful to have anything new and carries things with pride! Leash trained: He is good on the leash, walks 3 to 5 miles daily with the pack. If the leash or another dog’s leash becomes tangled on his back feet, River will attack it and his feet. He is still hypersensitive to touch on that part of his body and we work on this. I suspect it is a trigger from a traumatic event in his past or long term pain from his cancer. Barking dogs are ignored on the walk and while interested in farm animals – cattle, dairy cows, horses, alpacas, pigs, goats, fowl, donkeys, sheep – the barn cats will get his focus more often. Activity Level:  River is an active dog who likes to run and play chase in the yard, rolls around on his back and plays with toys. Shaking toys while he slaps himself in the head with the toy is comical. He loves the Kong woobas and similar toys. He walks every day 3 to 5 miles and has access to the yard anytime he wishes to go out. Fence: A physical fence is preferred for River. He is still sensitive to touching in certain areas of his body and for his safety we feel he would do best with a physically fenced yard. Behavior: River is an active and playful dog who came to us without understanding boundaries. He was a large puppy in most of his behaviors and manners. You could see he wanted to be petted and fussed over but did not trust people really. His first week with us was an assessment week. River was insecure about the world and would bark and lunge at his foster dad. It was very obvious neither one trusted the other. River went readily to our son who is with us due to Covid19 and to our friend’s husband who came to pick up their dogs. River would go with the pack daily for the walk and allowed his foster dad to put the leash on him. The other dogs did not trust River either and he tried to engage a few in play but was too intense for them. The first few weeks with us, he learned to trust us and the other dogs slowly began to trust him. River spent much of his time learning boundaries and not to use his mouth on humans. He had not been taught that when young and would try to mouth play with us. We allowed no use of his mouth on us at all so he could quickly learn the rules and where the boundaries were. River is not a demanding dog and is easy going. He enjoys attention and is beginning to allow grooming (ears, nails, brushing, bathing) to be done without any reactivity. Being near people in the evening and trying to be a lap dog is how he likes to be. River will poke you, use his mouth to bring your hand back or use his front paws when he wants you to continue to pet him. River is a talker and uses low growly noises with intonation to talk to you. His “arrr, arr, arr” is quite deep and comical. Medical History:  River is neutered, microchipped, current on all vaccines, heartworm negative and on preventative, Leshimaniasis is negative. He did have an ear infection that required vet intervention that cleared up easily. Cleaning his ears and teeth is done frequently and he tolerates the process well. When at the vet, River was diagnosed with cancer.  He received chemotherapy for 4 weeks, which he tolerated very well, and was pronounced cured. Some of the behavioral quirks River initially demonstrated, we feel was because he did not feel well and was in pain. The oncology veterinarian who cared for River shared that River was an excellent patient and was very happy to be able to report the cancer was cured.  River originates from Turkey where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments:  River comes when called, is a sweet and funny guy, loves to hug you and is not demanding at all. He is happy,  he responds to simple commands in English, is an excellent passenger, likes going with us and plays nicely with all the others. River does have some quirks and can be reactive when fearful something is going to hurt. I strongly suspect he was not treated well before going to rescue and he had pain with the cancer. This made River reactive when his lower abdomen to tail was touched. The attacking the leash and his own feet when tangled is just weird. He does not bother the dog walking human nor the other dogs, just himself!! He enjoys his ears being cleaned, is tolerating being brushed but is on edge as he is fearful it is going to hurt. Body language changes and you can see the concern in his eyes. River has beautiful deep brown eyes that are very expressive and difficult to photograph well because of is black fur. River readily gives you his front paws when asked, allows me to check his teeth and scale them if needed. Patience in the bath is needed as he is learning a bath is nice and will not hurt. The sprayer makes him nervous at first. Likely he was sprayed with a hose is his past. River is food motivated, eats normally, loves raw carrots, green beans, cucumbers, baked sweet potatoes, pumpkin and winter squash, watermelon, cantaloupe, apples, any berries. Pizza crust is a big favorite!  Currently River eats in a separate room from the others, but with 4’ spacing, he is fine in the same area as the others.  River takes a little coaxing to give up something he has and really wants. He will drop it and is learning the command “Leave It”. Playing tug and fetch are favorite activities and he enjoys toys, bones and flying around the yard! River sleeps in our room and divides his time between our bed and a dog bed. He is usually an easy going, funny dog who is just happy. We supervise closely when our grandkids are at the house.  River likes kids – these are age 3 to 11- but we feel he should not live with children as he is still sensitive to being touched in the hindquarters and kids do not always remember or mean to stop petting before the waist. Foster Location: Conesus, NY Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Russell/Houdini

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  Russell has learned his name and knows “Come here” and “Sit”. He is learning to give paw. He loves his foster s... show more
Socialization/training:  Russell has learned his name and knows “Come here” and “Sit”. He is learning to give paw. He loves his foster siblings and wants to play with every dog he sees on his walks. He would like a companion dog who would play with him. He has not been around cats. He has seen children on his walks and is interested in them although sometimes they startle him if they are doing something he hasn’t seen before. Crate trained: Yes Leash trained: Yes, he is working on walking calmly past other dogs. Activity Level: Russell is always busy outside and wants to explore everything! He is fascinated by the birds in the trees. Inside, he loves playing with his toys, especially rope toys. After getting his energy out, he likes to curl up and snuggle with his people. Fence: Russell is very active and can jump quite high, so a five or six foot fence is a must for him. He can easily jump three feet. He is not a candidate for an invisible fence. Behavior: Russell is a happy, playful boy who is interested in exploring everything he sees. He loves splashing in the pond and watching birds fly through the yard. He can roo (even with his tennis ball in his mouth), and often does to let his humans know it is time for dinner or a walk. He even sang along to the sirens during our town’s Easter parade! Russell loves to go on walks around the neighborhood and through the woods. He is nervous around new things and will crouch down when he is startled, but once something is not new he is curious and wants to check it out. Russell is very athletic and fast, and can jump easily. He would be a great agility dog or hiking buddy! He would love to go on adventures, then snuggle with his people at night. He is very sweet-natured and thinks he is a lap dog! Medical History: Russell is up to date on his shots, neutered, microchipped, and healthy. He is on HWP.  He loved the attention at the vet’s office. Foster Comments: Russell is a sweet, active boy who would love to explore then cuddle on the couch! He needs a high fence, as he is very athletic, and would do best with another dog to play with. He has not been cat tested. We think he could get along with a feline sibling, as he has gotten used to seeing our chickens in their yard. We think he would be good with young children when he gets to know them and he would do well with older children. Foster Location: South-central MA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Truman

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training: Characteristics of English Setters include: energetic, mischievous, playful and affectionate. Characteristics of... show more
Socialization/training: Characteristics of English Setters include: energetic, mischievous, playful and affectionate. Characteristics of a DEAF English Setter: energetic, mischievous, playful and affectionate, yep same as a hearing Setter! Truman hasn’t met a human he didn’t like with the exception of his vet! His first week here he lived with 5 other dogs and was great but it took him some time to feel comfortable with one of them. He recently was introduced to another foster from Turkey and it was love at first sight. Crate trained: Yes, Truman sleeps throughout the night in his crate on a cushy bed. He eats in his crate and is crated if we leave. I point to the crate with a treat and he goes in. Leash trained: Yes, he will stalk robins while walking but will not pull you over. He’s more interested in birds while on a walk than humans or other dogs. Activity Level: He’s young so he’s full of energy. He loves to run in the yard with the other dogs. Inside he loves to play with toys, take leisurely naps and watch the nature channel through the window. Fence: A fence is required because of his hearing loss. He has been respectful of the fence and will sit and watch the birds and squirrels through it. He’ll put his paws on the fence to be petted from the neighbors.   Behavior: He loves his humans and will let you love on him for as long as you like. Medical History:   Truman is deaf. He is neutered, microchipped, current on vaccines and is on heartworm preventative and flea and tick preventative. His next leishmaniasis test is due in May 2022. Truman originates from Turkey where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: It took us about a week to realize Truman was deaf. We thought, WOW, what a sound sleeper! Truman doesn’t let his hearing loss slow him down. It’s a learning process for Truman and this foster family in regards to communicating with each other. We are using hand signals with Truman and he seems to be doing well. Truman is an outdoors guy! He loves to play with tennis balls in the yard but he doesn’t always retrieve them. Truman likes to play chase with the other dogs or take afternoon naps in the sunshine. Inside he will snuggle with you on the sofa or play with his toys. Truman is hoping his furever family will “hear” that he is up adoption and submit their application. Foster Location: Schaumburg, IL Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - West

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training:  West loves to be outside. He has learned that barking gets him out of the house and into the yard. (Remember he... show more
Socialization/training:  West loves to be outside. He has learned that barking gets him out of the house and into the yard. (Remember he alerts us to his bathroom needs by barking.) He only does steps to the second floor when he wants too, so after nights of half carrying him upstairs, I’ve allowed him to sleep where he wants. In the morning, we most often find him in his open crate in the family room. He will shake in new situations (e.g. when he was first exposed to the front yard). We soothe him with words and massages. He knows his name, sit, here, come, quit, off, leave it, but he doesn’t always choose to respond. He has been to Pet Smart and Lowe’s where his behavior was excellent. He enjoys pets from strangers, but wouldn’t take treats from the Lowe’s employees. West has been slow to eat any treats. At first, West took no treats, eventually took them in the sunroom, back yard and on the cabin porch. West takes treats gently from your fingers. He has greeted our sons’ dogs, neighborhood dogs, dogs in stores and on walkways in a friendly manner. He rides beautifully in a car. We have traveled two and a half hours to our cabin several times and he sits quietly content in the backseat. He does need assistance to get in and out of the car, which I believe is more a reaction to an unfamiliar situation than inability. He is just beginning to show an interest in toys. He loves paper, so don’t leave grocery list, tissues, or magazines within his reach. He will snatch pens or small items from a table and makes a game of giving them up. He has chewed four leashes and one harness. He will stand quietly beside you as you talk to a neighbor chewing away. We’ve lost several leashes that way so now we now use one that is part chain, part cloth. He chewed his harness left on a sunroom chair, so I’d suggest keeping harness and leash out of reach. Crate trained: Yes. His crate is open at all times and sometimes he’ll go inside to nap. We do crate him when we leave the house but not at night. He is reluctant to go in, but settles immediately and is calm, sometimes asleep, when we return home. He may remain in his crate for a time after the door is open. Leash trained: West has made great strides in training with the leash. Initially he walked on his back legs, he was pulling so hard. I feared he’d choke himself so we bought an Eagloo Dog Harness. Though exercise has been limited due to heartworm treatment, he has made great progress. A trainer suggested we hook the leash to the loop on his chest and also the loop on his collar. He will initially pull as he tries to smell, but once familiar with the path, he pulls significantly less and may even walk at my side. If I’m proactive and spot the squirrel first, I say “leave it” which decreases the pulling and the barking. He will pull and jump when he spots “prey.” Every new path brings new smells and naturally an increase in pulling and West is a strong boy. We have used a gentle lead about a half dozen times. He allows us to put it on without issue and it does reduce his pulling significantly, even on new paths. With the gentle lead I have used two leashes, one on the lead and the other on the harness. Activity Level: We have never seen him run free, due to heartworm treatment, but I imagine he’d love running and sniffing along the fence line, chasing butterflies, bugs and birds. He has displayed playful gestures towards the one year old neighbor retriever, but again, he was leashed and unable to pursue the neighbor’s dog. If off leash, I’m convinced he would pursue birds and squirrels and I doubt if he’d respond to verbal directions to come. Inside the home he is calm, unless he spots a squirrel through the window. He loves his doggie bed, his blanket and the floor. He will join me on the couch, but rarely gets on it alone. Fence: He does require a physical fence. I have no doubt he’d run and not respond to verbal commands if he had an opportunity because he has a strong prey drive. Remember: No cats! We have worked on “come” for quite a while in the boundaries of our home, sunroom, and leash length outside. He responds beautifully as long as a squirrel hasn’t caught his eyes. Because he is always on a leash, we can’t assess whether he’d jump a fence, though he has shown no effort to do so. On a screen in porch, he has not jumped against the screen when he is very excited about what he sees in the yard. Behavior: West LOVES and seeks your attention for head, ears and belly scratches. He’ll sit in front of you as you scratch around his ears and become so relaxed he’ll slide to the floor. He loves belly rubs and will lie beside you or at your feet enjoying them. He’ll sit beside you on the couch while you scratch, rub or pet. He does not like hugs or embraces that he may be feel confines him. Once he has had enough, he’ll get up to lay by himself. He does like to cuddle with his blanket and may pull it off of his bed and put his head on it. If I spread his blanket on the couch, he’ll always jump up to join me. My husband said he is the best behaved dog he’s ever bathed. West stood quietly still, while he used a hand held shower hose. West allowed us to rub him dry and even assisted by rubbing his face on the towel. When in the sunroom, initially he’d totally ignore us when we called him. Now we’ll see a twitch of his ears or a wag of his tail, as he ignores us. Once he breaks visual contact with the animal, he’ll come to “here” as we point to the spot in front of us. We have tried a whistle to get his attention and I believe he could be trained to respond to that. West can be very stubborn, especially when he doesn’t want to come into the house. I did say he LOVES being outside? Of course he’s on a leash/harness with us so we can, using the bar on the harness, pull to get him moving. The veterinarian’s office told me they carried him in after his potty breaks. I have wondered if having another dog in the home to model behavior might be an asset, though not a necessity. West gets very excited when he sees his harness or we go to the door. He has a “dance routine” where he twirls several times till he’ll eventually sit in front of you to get his harness on. He has quietly sat, eventually sleeping, hours in our sunroom or screened in porch watching the birds at the feeders. He gets very excited, barking and jumping, when he sees squirrels, geese, ducks, larger birds, and deer either from the window or while outside. Medical History:   West was neutered in February. He had his last heartworm injection on April 30th. At that time, his blood showed no baby worms or live adults. He continues restrictive exercise until May 30th. His heartworm preventative is due on May 30th and he's also on monthly tick and flea prevention. The veterinarian recommended teeth cleaning. He is microchipped and up to date on vaccinations.   Foster Comments: West is a handsome boy who attracts a lot of attention and compliments. He was underweight upon arrival and not a motivated eater. We encourage him by adding a little moist food and shredded mozzarella to his dry food. He continues to leave uneaten food in his dish to finish later.  West would do well in a home alone or with another dog. No cats! He loves and wants to be outside a lot, so he needs someone home part of the day. He wouldn’t be happy staying inside all day. West has shown no reaction to loud noises, including chair saws and thunderstorms. You do need to be careful if walking him near moving cars because he shows no awareness of the danger and might wander in their path. (He weaves as he walks on a leash.) Foster location: Mechanicsburg, PA Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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Available - Yara

Female Young English Setter (mixed)
Socialization/training: Yara knows sit, down, come. We are working on stay currently. Crate trained: No, she has serious anxiety about c... show more
Socialization/training: Yara knows sit, down, come. We are working on stay currently. Crate trained: No, she has serious anxiety about crates, and should not be spending time or sleeping in one. She has free range of the house privileges without accidents or damages, so a crate is not necessary for her daily life. Leash trained: Yes, in progress: knows to sit to put on her harness, walks and runs well with a front clip harness. Activity level: Very playful and sweet, enjoys playtime with other dogs, and spending long swaths of time “patrolling” the yard for squirrels, birds, and cats. We go on one 1-2 mile walk or run per day, and she will spend about 2-3 hours in the yard per day. She also really enjoys the dog park and has learned to go down the slide on the agility course. Fence: Required. MUST be a 6 ft fence, privacy is preferred, she has attempted to even climb that. She cannot have an invisible fence, she will break out for squirrels and cats. Behavior: INCREDIBLY sweet. She is a snuggler extraordinaire and gets along great with the resident 12 year old IS-mix. She LOVES the children she has met. She gets really excited to meet new people and will sit down, because she knows sitting gets her what she wants. She is very smart, aims to please, and will learn behaviors and commands quickly. She has an incredible prey drive, and will climb on the furniture to see the cats, birds, and squirrels. I have a porch where she spends a lot of the day looking out on the yard when she is not actually in it! She has pretty serious separation anxiety, but is fine when not crated. She is able to be left alone for 4-5 hours at a time, before needing a bathroom break. Medical History: Had an ear infection, but is off of antibiotics now. Currently UTD on heartworm and flea/tick prevention. She is spayed, microchipped and up to date on vaccinations. Her next lesihmaniasis test is due in April 2022. Yara originates from Turkey where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: I LOVE this sweet girl and have had to repeatedly talk myself down from keeping her. She is the perfect dog for an active family. She loves to hike, walk, and play, then wind down in the evening with cuddles and love time. She is eager to please and easy to train, especially with positive reinforcement and lots of treats. She will need a family who are home most of the day or have a person to give her a bathroom break and yard run time in the middle of the day. I have a dog walker and it is perfect for her. She would benefit from further training to bond with her new owners and learn specific skills/house rules. Foster Location: Indianapolis, IN Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less
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No Longer Accepting Applications - Jericho

Male Young English Setter
Socialization/training: He gets along great with all the people and dogs we have met so far. He loves people and is super affectionate.... show more
Socialization/training: He gets along great with all the people and dogs we have met so far. He loves people and is super affectionate. At the dog park he interacts with dogs for a little bit but is more interested in chasing birds. He is learning his name and comes when called in the house and in the yard unless distracted by an animal. He is being trained on our invisible fence. He loves to go for rides in the car (no illness) but doesn’t understand that the human driver must focus on driving rather than petting him. He prefers to lay on people’s laps whether in the car or at home on the couch. This can make driving alone with him a challenge unless you have a crate or a restraint on him. Crate trained: Jericho happily goes in the crate at bedtime and likes getting a treat for this good behavior. He sleeps in the crate all night. During the day he likes to be outside as much as possible looking for birds, but when inside, he lounges on the couch, or lays on the floor or dog bed while I work. We rarely leave him home alone but the two times we did, he was fine for 2-4 hours in the crate. Leash trained: He does ok on a harness but needs some work with pulling. We mostly use a 16’ retractable leash during hikes to give him more freedom. Occasionally, we use a standard 5-6’ leash.  Good with Kids: Definitely fine with school-aged children that are respectful to dogs. The kids in our neighborhood love him so much they have invited him for a sleep over! Good with Cats: The temp foster had resident house cats that he got along with and our neighbor’s cat came out on the porch to meet Jericho and Jericho pretty much ignored him. Activity Level: Laid back inside the house and moderately active in the outdoors. He enjoys playing with the resident dogs in the backyard and in the house. He is gentle when he plays and respects our older female resident dog that is a little grumpy. He plays with/chews on chew toys/balls and stuffed animals, and also sweet potato chews but is not a constant chewer. He ducks when you toss a ball his way, but he will go pick it up to chew on. He enjoys daily 2 to 3 mile walks but tolerates missing a walk on rainy days very well. He enjoys longer walks on the weekend.  Fence: Jericho is being trained on an invisible fence. A fence whether invisible or not would be required since he is very birdy.  Behavior: Jericho is definitely a cuddler and demands attention at times. He very much loves being up on his person’s lap. He gives kisses when being petted and loves snuggling. He is a slow eater and sometimes leaves food in his bowl. He also prefers to eat with our other dogs or with his people in the room, rather than alone. Medical History:  He will come to his adopter with all his records from Turkey and from his foster’s hometown vet. He was neutered and was started on heartworm prevention meds prior to traveling to the US. During his first vet visit, just 3 days after his arrival in the US, he was diagnosed with skin and ear infections due to allergies and was put on Apoquel to manage his allergic reaction for about 4 weeks, Mozotic drops for his ears for 12 days and cephalexin for his skin for 14 days. He has been off Apoquel for 48 hours as of writing this bio, and although we see some paw biting and itching, it’s very minimal. At this point, we suspect it was the Iams chicken kibble that was his allergy trigger, but we’ll see how the next few days go. The exact cause of the allergy may take time and patience and a good vet to figure out. He is up to date on vaccinations and is microchipped. Jericho originates from Turkey where Leishmaniasis is endemic. He tested negative before coming to the USA, but the parasite can remain dormant in the system for many years, so potential adopters must be willing to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. Typically, the test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test seems to vary widely by area, but is approximately $150-$250. Foster Comments: Jericho is a gentle and super lovable boy with a streaky blonde hairdo and a magnificent tongue! He is excellent with people, whether adults or children, as well as other dogs and cats. He enjoys the outdoors and can be lively on trail hikes with all the smells and birds/squirrels/bunnies to chase! He requires a fenced (invisible fence ok) yard and prefers to have another dog partner to keep him company and hunt within the yard. His ideal family would take him to many outdoor places to socialize with people and dogs. Foster Location:  Manchester, MD Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000-mile distance between adopters & foster home. If interstate transport is provided for your adopted dog, there will be an additional charge of $50.00 for the required Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“Health Certificate”).  Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000-mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000-mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far Western states, from Eastern states, may have additional restrictions. show less